Manufacturing & Prototyping

10 Tips For Designing Silicone Medical Components

Designing medical device components for silicone requires up-front design considerations due to silicone’s unique properties. Maximizing the benefits of the LIM (liquid injection molding) process, can improve component function, maximize assembly efficiencies, and increase speed-to-market. Download the top 10 tips list to help guide you through the process of Silicone parts for medical components.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, White Papers, MDB

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Circularly Polarized Microwave Antenna Element With Very Low Off-Axis Cross-Polarization

The goal of this work was to improve offaxis cross-polarization performance and ease of assembly of a circularly polarized microwave antenna element. To ease assembly, the initial design requirement of Hexweb support for the internal circuit part, as well as the radiating disks, was eliminated.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs

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Flash Cracking Reactor for Waste Plastic Processing

Conversion of waste plastic to energy is a growing problem that is especially acute in space exploration applications. Moreover, utilization of heavy hydrocarbon resources (wastes, waxes, etc.) as fuels and chemicals will be a growing need in the future. Existing technologies require a trade-off between product selectivity and feedstock conversion. The objective of this work was to maintain high plastic-to-fuel conversion without sacrificing the liquid yield. The developed technology accomplishes this goal with a combined understanding of thermodynamics, reaction rates, and mass transport to achieve high feed conversion without sacrificing product selectivity.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs

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Ultra-Low Heat- Leak, High- Temperature Superconducting Current Leads for Space Applications

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has a need for current leads used in an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) for space applications. These leads must comply with stringent requirements such as a heat leak of approximately 100 μW or less while conducting up to 10 A of electric current, from more than 90 K down to 10 K. Additionally, a length constraint of < 300 mm length and < 50 mm diameter is to be maintained.

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How to Design Your Part for Direct Digital Manufacturing

Traditional manufacturing methods, like machining and injection molding, have many rules, restrictions, and limitations. These rules don’t apply when using direct digital manufacturing. Designers are free to concentrate on the best design and not concern themselves with manufacturability. Direct digital manufacturing (DDM) is a process unlike any other. Using additive fabrication technology to make products without tooling, molding and machining, DDM gives manufacturing a new set of capabilities that make what was once impossible or impractical a reality. These new capabilities eliminate constraints that have ruled the art of product design Download the free whitepaper to learn more.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, White Papers

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Aerospace Tooling: 3D Technology Enables Virtual Design

Building aircraft has always been a struggle between the size of their components and the need to craft them carefully. More than any other device, airplanes epitomize the concept that “the devil is in the details” because in small errors lies the potential for great mischief such as increased drag and decreased range. In this white paper you will learn how the laser tracker gives aerospace manufacturers the ability to be more cost competitive by shifting the whole process of design and development into the virtual realm.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, White Papers

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Castable Amorphous Metal Mirrors and Mirror Assemblies

Commercial applications include optics for spacecraft and satellites, mirror components for telescopes, and mirrors for lasers, sensing, and solar energy collection. The use of mirror assemblies is commonplace in the aerospace industry, as most satellites and spacecraft contain optics. The fabrication of these mirrors is extremely complex due to the nature of their intended use, which includes telescope lenses, camera optics, or laser mirrors. Some of the common requirements of spacecraft mirrors are that they have the correct optical curvature to some defined tolerance, they have low surface roughness, they have high reflectivity, and they are rigid (either against thermal expansion or flexing).

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs

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