Manufacturing & Prototyping

Selecting the Right Material for 3D Printing

This industrial 3D printing white paper explores the properties of thermoplastic and metal materials available with direct metal laser sintering, selective laser sintering and stereolithography technologies. It also includes a quick-reference guide of material attributes that can steer you toward the proper grade. Download your free copy today!

Posted in: White Papers, Electronics, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Test & Measurement

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From The Design Lab: An Insider’s Guide To Laser Sintering

While all additive manufacturing (AM) processes share the ability to create multifaceted parts with intricate features, each system has its own design guidelines to ensure accuracy and optimize part design for the build process and compatible materials. These design guidelines and trade knowledge are usually not shared externally, which can leave the average design engineer feeling adrift on a sea of 3D printing challenges. However, through years of experience, Stratasys Direct Manufacturing has gathered the most efficient design guidelines for one of the more popular 3D printing technologies: Laser Sintering. This article details a study undertaken by Stratasys Direct Manufacturing and the University of Texas (UT) at Austin which vetted tolerances for challenging LS design features such as minimum wall thickness, optimal build orientation for small to large features, and feature distances and areas in relation to part walls. Our goal is to make the information collected within the study well-known to the average design engineer and present working expectations for what LS can do, and therefore minimize errors and achieve consistently successful LS parts.

Posted in: White Papers, Manufacturing & Prototyping

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Products of Tomorrow: April 2016

The technologies NASA develops don’t just blast off into space. They also improve our lives here on Earth. Life-saving search-and-rescue tools, implantable medical devices, advances in commercial aircraft safety, increased accuracy in weather forecasting, and the miniature cameras in our cellphones are just some of the examples of NASA-developed technology used in products today.

Posted in: Products, Aerospace, Manufacturing & Prototyping

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Linear Motor

Nippon Pulse America (Radford, VA) released the SL083 scaleless linear motor with a built-in linear encoder for positioning applications that would benefit from the repeatability, reliability, and robustness of a linear motor, with up to 5 μm in resolution. The motor consists of a tubular stainless steel shaft and a non-contact forcer. It requires no lubrication, and features a non-critical air gap that eliminates variation in the force. The housing is made of non-magnetic aluminum.

Posted in: Products, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Motion Control

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Panel-Mount Piezo Drives

The Ndrive QLe digital, panel-mount nanopositioning piezo drives from Aerotech (Pittsburgh, PA) are designed for use with the Aerotech Automation 3200 (A3200) motion controller. The drives enable coordinated motion between piezo stages and servo axes at higher rates than other controller/drive products. Featuring a dual-core, 456-MHz, floating-point DSP, the drives feature position latching and single-axis or multi-axis position synchronized output (PSO) to generate pulses based on actual position feedback.

Posted in: Products, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Motion Control

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Encoders

Celera Motion (Bedford, MA) introduced the MicroE Veratus™ Series encoders incorporating VeraPath™ technology. All interpolation, automatic gain control (AGC), and signal processing is performed in the sensor head that measures 35 × 13.5 × 10 mm. Interpolation in the sensor head provides resolution from 5 μm to 20 nm for linear applications, with speeds up to 5 m/s. The encoders feature multiple mounting configurations, industry-standard analog and digital incremental encoder outputs, built-in limits, flexible index selection, and status LED in the sensor head.

Posted in: Products, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Motion Control

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Brushless DC Motors

Crouzet Motors (Vista, CA) introduced brushless DC motors with CANopen® technology. The new communications protocol allows design engineers to connect multiple brushless motors to the various components in a system. The CANopen interface permits connection of up to 127 brushless DC motors with a single, shielded, two-wire cable. Data may be transmitted at speeds up to 125 kBd at distances over 550 yards. At lower baud rates, the transmission distance can exceed three miles, making communications flexible to virtually any location. Under the communications protocol, motors can be controlled separately or together.

Posted in: Products, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Motion Control

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