Manufacturing & Prototyping

Growth Method for Chalcongenide Phase-Change Nanostructures

Nanometer-scale materials can provide smaller devices than those currently available. Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California Recently, one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructures, such as nanowires and nanotubes, have become the focal point of research in nanotechnology due to their fascinating properties. These properties are intrinsically associated with low dimensionality and small diameters, which may lead to unique applications in various nanoscale devices. It is generally accepted that 1-D nanostructures provide an excellent test ground for understanding the dependence of physical, electrical, thermal, optical, and mechanical properties on material dimensionality and physical size. In particular, 1-D semiconductor nanostructures, which exhibit different properties as compared with their bulk or thin film counterparts, have shown great potential in future nanoelectronics applications in data storage, computing, and sensing devices.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs

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ELID Grinding of Large Aspheres

Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland This work focused on a manufacturing process to produce silicon carbide optical surfaces with low mid-spatial surface errors. Mid-spatial frequency (MSF) and high-spatial frequency (HSF) surface errors in the grinding of fast aspheres are amplified in hard ceramics like silicon carbide due to cyclic tool wear rates, vibration, and tool deformation.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs

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Highly Aligned Electrospun Fibers and Mats

These mats have applications in fuel and solar cells, smart textiles, and in wound dressings and tissue engineering scaffolds. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia A modified electrospinning apparatus has been created for spinning highly aligned polymer fibers. Fiber placement, orientation, and porosity are difficult to control using conventional electrospinning apparatus. Conventional electrospinning creates randomly oriented fibers that are well suited to nonwoven mats, but not to other applications. This new technology will broaden the range of engineering applications of electrospun materials. The apparatus provides a simple and inexpensive means of producing fibers and mats of controlled fiber diameter, porosity, and thickness.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs

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How Paper-based 3D Printing Works: The Technology and Advantages

3D printers have been with us for decades, routinely turning 3D computer designs into detailed physical objects for product design, education, architecture, healthcare, mapping, historic preservation and other applications. These devices create models in a range of materials, including plastic, plaster, photopolymers, metal and sometimes even food. Each of these materials brings inherent advantages and disadvantages, depending upon your application. There’s one more to consider: paper.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, White Papers

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Mobile Robots Help Technicians Manufacture Airplanes

A new mobile assistant is being developed to support technicians in the airplane manufacturing industry when applying sealant, measuring, and testing — without putting them at risk. In the EU project known as VALERI (Validation of Advanced, Collaborative Robotics for Industrial Applications), a European consortium is engineering a mobile robot that operates autonomously and moves independently through a production hall, side-by-side with the engineers and technicians. It is not intended to replace the technician, but instead relieve them of stressful and monotonous duties and take over inspection duties.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Industrial Controls & Automation, Sensors, Test & Measurement, Aerospace, Aviation, Machinery & Automation, Robotics, News

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Engineers Develop Ultrastiff, Ultralight Material

Engineers at MIT and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have developed a new ultrastiff, ultralight material. The material is based on the use of microlattices with nanoscale features, combining great stiffness and strength with ultralow density. The actual production of such materials is made possible by a high-precision 3-D printing process called projection microstereolithography.By using the right mathematically determined structures to distribute and direct the loads — the way the arrangement of vertical, horizontal, and diagonal beams do in a structure like the Eiffel Tower — the lighter structure can maintain its strength."We found that for a material as light and sparse as aerogel [a kind of glass foam], we see a mechanical stiffness that’s comparable to that of solid rubber, and 400 times stronger than a counterpart of similar density. Such samples can easily withstand a load of more than 160,000 times their own weight,” said Associate Professor Nick Fang. SourceAlso: See other Materials and Coatings tech briefs.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling, Materials, Nanotechnology, News

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Thin Films Self-Assemble in One Minute

Researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have devised a technique whereby self-assembling nanoparticle arrays can form a highly ordered thin film over macroscopic distances in one minute.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Electronic Components, Photonics, Optics, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Materials, Coatings & Adhesives, Composites, Nanotechnology, News

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