Materials & Coatings

Coming Soon - High Performance Long Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials

Long fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites are the go to material for structural components in applications that push the envelope of what plastics can do, even replacing metals.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars, Materials

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Coming Soon - Engineering Plastics Development for New Market Demands

In Conjunction with SAEThis 30-minute Webinar on engineering plastics examines new measurable sustainable solutions, including polyamide-based products, that are meeting customer and market demands. The program focuses on automotive design and the implementation of value-added solutions for weight and cost savings relative to metal replacement, high temperature and chemically resistant nylon applications.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars, Materials, Plastics

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Coming Soon - Enhanced Tailpipe, Material Emission, and Leak Analysis with SIFT-MS

In Conjunction with SAERegulators and consumers demand increasingly lower levels of gaseous emissions from diverse automotive and aerospace sources, such as combustion exhaust, component emissions, and leakage. Emission compositions vary widely between sources but frequently consist of both volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and inorganic gases.

Posted in: Upcoming Webinars, Automotive, Materials

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Conformal Coatings Increase Reliability of Critical Aerospace/Defense Systems and Components

In the aerospace and defense industries, conformal coatings are used to protect components from the increasingly harsh environments in which they must operate. As technologies continue to advance, often becoming smaller and more complex and/or utilizing advanced materials in their design, many surface treatment options struggle to provide reliable protection. This Tech Talk examines Parylene conformal coatings and how they ensure the reliability of critical components when failure is not an option.

Posted in: Tech Talks, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials

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Will shape memory polymers play a prominent role in non-aerospace applications?

This week's Question: A featured Tech Brief in today's INSIDER highlighted a shape memory polymer from Langley Research Center. Designed initially for morphing spacecraft, the material changes shape when temperature shifts; the thermosetting polymer than returns to its original form once normal conditions are reached. The technology may also have applications in self-deployable structures, smart armors, intelligent medical devices, and other various morphing structures. What do you think? Will shape memory polymers play a prominent role in non-aerospace applications?

Posted in: Question of the Week, Materials

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Metal Finishing White Paper: Electropolishing to Improve Corrosion Protection

One of the most common applications for electropolishing is to enhance corrosion resistance on a wide variety of metal alloys, specifically stainless steel. Electropolishing is quickly becoming a replacement process for a long established treatment: Passivation. Passivation is a chemical process that has been used for years to help restore contaminated stainless steel to original corrosion specifications.

Posted in: White Papers, Aerospace, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Materials

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Electric Field Activated Shape Memory Polymer Composite

Applications include intelligent medical devices, smart armor, turbine blade stabilization, and aircraft wing stabilization.NASA’s Langley Research Center has developed a novel shape memory polymer (SMP) made from composite materials for use in morphing structures. In response to an external stimulus such as a temperature change or an electric field, the thermosetting material changes shape, but then returns to its original form once conditions return to normal. Through a precise combination of monomers, conductive fillers, and elastic layers, the NASA polymer matrix can be triggered by two effects — Joule heating and dielectric loss — to increase the response. The new material remedies the limitations of other SMPs currently on the market; namely, the slow stimulant response times, the strength inconsistencies, and the use of toxic epoxies that may complicate manufacturing. NASA has developed prototypes and now seeks a partner to license the technology for commercial applications.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials, Electric power, Product development, Heat treatment, Composite materials, Polymers, Smart materials

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White Papers

Radar Waveforms for A&D and Automotive Radar
Sponsored by Rohde and Schwarz AD
Forging as a Viable Alternative to 3D Printing of Non-Ferrous Metal Parts
Sponsored by Weldaloy
AGM Thumbtack™ Valves for Small Enclosures: Smaller and Drier
Sponsored by AGM Container Controls
CNC Guide: Best Design Practices for Custom Machined Parts
Sponsored by Xometry
The Best Springs You Haven't Tried Yet
Sponsored by Rotor Clip
Algorithms for Change Point Analysis
Sponsored by Numerical Algorithms Group

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