Materials & Coatings

Insulating Materials and Precursor Formulations, and Method of Forming

Methods were developed for forming an insulating material that combines a polysilazane, a cross-linking compound, and a gas-generating compound to form a reaction mixture, and curing the reaction mixture to form a modified polysilazane. The gas-generating compound may be water, an alcohol, an amine, or a matrix comprising one of a reaction product of a polysilazane and an isocyanate, and a reaction product of a polysilazane and an epoxy resin. The matrix also comprises a plurality of interconnected pores produced from a reaction of the polysilazane and the epoxy resin.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials

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Selective Clay Placement Within a Silicate Clay-Epoxy-Blend Nanocomposite

The resulting toughened epoxies and composites are used for commercial and military aircraft, and marine applications. John H. Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio The dispersion of a layered silicate into an epoxy matrix often increases the material strength and stiffness, but reduces resin toughness. This innovation is a method to selectively place organically modified clay within specific regions of an epoxy blend, where the clay provides maximum benefit to the material performance. By this process, the material yield stress was observed to increase by 40 to 100%, depending on the blend composition. The toughness of the material, as defined by the area under the stress-strain curve, was observed to increase or remain unchanged.

Posted in: Briefs, Composites, Materials

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Zero-G Condensing Heat Exchanger with Integral Disinfection

The proposed concept promises to improve the life support environment for astronauts. John H. Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio A concept for a unique zero-g condensing heat exchanger that has an integral ozone-generating capacity has been conceived. This design will contribute to the control of metabolic water vapor in the air, and also provide disinfection of the resultant condensate, and the disinfection of the air stream that flows through the condensing heat exchanger.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials, Medical

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Products of Tomorrow: January 2015

The technologies NASA develops don’t just blast off into space. They also improve our lives here on Earth. Life-saving search-and-rescue tools, implantable medical devices, advances in commercial aircraft safety, increased accuracy in weather forecasting, and the miniature cameras in our cellphones are just some of the examples of NASA-developed technology used in products today.

Posted in: Articles, Products, Techs for License, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Materials, Sensors

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Low Viscosity, Two Component Epoxy

Master Bond EP112LS is a two-part epoxy that is well suited for impregnation, potting, encapsulation, sealing and coating applications, particularly in the aerospace and optoelectronics industries. EP112LS is optically clear, features reliable non-yellowing properties and has a refractive index of 1.55. This electrically insulative system is resistant to chemicals including water, oils, fuels, acids and bases. EP112LS is serviceable over the temperature range of -60°F to +450°F.

Posted in: Products, Products, Coatings & Adhesives, Photonics

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Laser Optics Coatings

Coated laser optics are used to optimize the characteristics of the emitted laser beam. However, losses are produced at each glass surface - thus the number of optics should be reduced to a minimum. Laser Components (Hudson, NH) offers laser optics that have complex coatings on both the front and the back. From a technical standpoint, this was almost impossible to achieve for a long time because the coating process on the second side heated the first coating and often caused it to crack. The more complex the coating, the more pronounced the problem was.

Posted in: Products, Products, Coatings & Adhesives, Lasers & Laser Systems, Optics, Photonics

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Heat-Conducting Plastic Blend Developed

The spaghetti-like internal structure of most plastics makes it hard for them to cast away heat, but a University of Michigan (U-M) research team has made a plastic blend that does so 10 times better than its conventional counterparts. Because plastics restrict the flow of heat, their use is limited in technologies like computers, smartphones, cars, or airplanes — places that could benefit from their properties, but where heat dissipation is important.

Posted in: Articles, UpFront, Plastics

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