Materials

Roof Tiles Clean the Air

A team of University of California, Riverside’s Bourns College of Engineering students has developed a titanium dioxide roof tile coating that removes up to 97 percent of smog-causing nitrogen oxides.The students' calculations show that 21 tons of nitrogen oxides would be eliminated daily if tiles on one million roofs were coated with their titanium dioxide mixture. The researchers coated two identical, off-the-shelf clay tiles with different amounts of titanium dioxide, a common compound found in everything from paint to food to cosmetics. The tiles were then placed inside a miniature atmospheric chamber that the students built out of wood, Teflon, and PVC piping.The chamber was connected to a source of nitrogen oxides and a device that reads concentrations of nitrogen oxides. The students used ultraviolet light to simulate sunlight, which activates the titanium dioxide and allows it to break down the nitrogen oxides. They found the titanium dioxide coated tiles removed between 88 percent and 97 percent of the nitrogen oxides.SourceAlso: Learn about Spectroscopic Determination of Trace Contaminants in High-Purity Oxygen.

Posted in: Remediation Technologies, Green Design & Manufacturing, Materials, Coatings & Adhesives, Test & Measurement, News

Read More >>

Aircraft Wings Change Shape in Flight

The EU project SARISTU (Smart Intelligent Aircraft Structures) aims to reduce kerosene consumption by six percent, and integrating flexible landing devices into aircraft wings is one step towards that target. A new mechanism alters the landing flap’s shape to dynamically accommodate the airflow. Algorithms to control the required shape modifications in flight were programmed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems ENAS in Chemnitz, in collaboration with colleagues from the Italian Aerospace Research Center (CIRA) and the University of Naples."We’ve come up with a silicon skin with alternate rigid and soft zones,” Said Andreas Lühring from Fraunhofer IFAM. “There are five hard and three soft zones, enclosed within a silicon skin cover extending over the top.”The mechanism sits underneath the soft zones, the areas that are most distended. While the novel design is noteworthy, it is the material itself that stands out, since the flexible parts are made of elastomeric foam that retains their elasticity even at temperatures ranging from -55 to 80° Celsius.Four 90-centimeter-long prototypes — two of which feature skin segments — are already undergoing testing.SourceAlso: Learn about Active Wing Shaping Control.

Posted in: Materials, Mechanical Components, Aerospace, Aviation, News

Read More >>

Metal Injection Molding Turns the Volume Up, and Down

When increased quantities of metal parts are needed, metal injection molding (MIM) is often a logical next step. Our free MIM white paper covers the multi-step process involved in molding metal parts, detailed technical specs needed for design, commonly used materials and a comparison to other metal-forming technologies like direct metal laser sintering and die casting.

Posted in: Materials, White Papers

Read More >>

Liquid Silicone Rubber Takes the Heat

Our comprehensive white paper on liquid silicone rubber provides a detailed look at the injection-molding process and offers guidelines to achieve better molded LSR parts. While there are some shared similarities to thermoplastic injection molding, LSR is a thermoset material with a unique set of design characteristics.

Posted in: Materials, White Papers

Read More >>

Lubricant Selection: What Every Design Engineer Needs to Know

Simply stated, lubrication refers to the age-old science of friction reduction. People have been using lubricants for thousands of years, experimenting with waxes and oils from vegetables, fish, and animals to move heavy materials with equipment designed to gain mechanical advantage. In more recent years, the discovery of petroleum oil in the 1800s ushered in a new era of lubrication developments as people learned how to refine this oil and use it for a variety of purposes. Machinery could now be developed to operate faster and under heavier loads by using lubricants to create a barrier that eliminates friction and metalon- metal contact.

Posted in: Materials, Mechanical Components, Machinery & Automation, White Papers

Read More >>

Elevated-Temperature, Highly Emissive Coating for Energy Dissipation of Large Surfaces

This coating can be used in high-temperature rocket nozzles, control surfaces, industrial furnaces, and transfer lines. Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama This coating demonstrates high emittance above 80% or better at broad wavelengths within the infrared spectrum. It has shown to have an extremely stable emittance at lower wavelengths within the infrared (IR) spectrum, where energy dissipation is critical at elevated temperatures. The coating has demonstrated increases in surface texturing, and ultimately an increase in emissivity when exposed to temperatures up to 2,050 °F (≈1,120 °C). It is also stable at continuous run, elevated temperatures, and shows no signs of spalling or erosion.

Posted in: Materials, Coatings & Adhesives, Briefs

Read More >>

Catalyst for Treatment and Control of Post-Combustion Emissions

This oxidation/reduction catalyst can be used in diesel and natural gas applications, and in nonautomotive pollution sources. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia Emissions from fossil-fuel combustion contribute significantly to smog, acid rain, and global warming problems, and are subject to stringent environmental regulations. These regulations are expected to become more stringent as state and regional authorities become more involved in addressing these environmental problems. Better systems are needed for catalytic control.

Posted in: Materials, Coatings & Adhesives, Briefs, TSP

Read More >>