Materials & Coatings

Approach for Achieving Flame Retardancy While Retaining Physical Properties in a Compatible Polymer Matrix

John F. Kennedy Space Center, Florida

NASA’s Kennedy Space Center (KSC) seeks to license its Advanced Fire Retardant Materials to industry. KSC’s scientists have developed processes and know-how to impart fire retardancy to common polymers such as nylons, polyesters, and acrylics. NASA developed this technology for use in personnel protective systems for launch pad personnel engaged in hazardous materials (HAZMAT) operations. The invention provides polymer blends containing polyhydroxyamide and one or more flammable polymers. The polymer blends are flame-retardant and have improved durability and heat stability compared to the flammable polymer portion of the blends.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials, Polymers, Fire, Protective equipment
Read More >>

Metal/Fiber Laminate and Fabrication Using a Porous Metal/Fiber Preform

This technology can be used in aeronautics, pressure vessels and storage tanks, ballistic protection, automotive structures, and composite doors and windows.

Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia

NASA’s Langley Research Center has developed a new technique to enable the preparation of metal/composite hybrid laminates, also known as fiber metal laminates (FML), by depositing metal directly onto fabric using a plasma deposition process. FMLs provide a useful combination of structural and functional properties for both aerospace and non-aerospace applications. Currently, FMLs are prepared in a compression process utilizing a press or autoclave with metallic layers (foils) sandwiched between layers of glass or graphite prepreg (preimpregnated fibers with a matrix resin). The NASA process deposits the metal on the fiber via plasma deposition. The porosity of the coated fabric allows for resin infusion.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials, Coatings, colorants, and finishes, Composite materials, Fabrics, Metals, Resins
Read More >>

Plastic Bearings Have Staying Power

Plastic bearings are strong enough to outperform and outlast metal in countless applications, however, they are often not considered a viable choice in the engineering community due to the common misconception that plastic is inferior or weaker compared metal. Uncover common misconceptions and learn the true reliability of tribologically-optimized plastic bearings in this whitepaper from the motion plastic experts.

Posted in: White Papers, Materials, Plastics
Read More >>

How the Laser, Optic, & Photonic Industries Benefit from Electropolishing

Improve precision and cleanliness with an enhanced surface finish.

Like other industries that utilize electropolishing to finish metal components, there are many benefits associated with electropolishing metal components used in photonics, optics or laser applications.

Posted in: White Papers, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials, Medical, Optics, Photonics
Read More >>

Electropolishing Prepares/Pre-Cleans Parts Properly Prior To Penetrant Testing

It is common, especially in the aerospace industry, for parts that are fracture critical to be Liquid Penetrant Inspected (LPI) prior to installation. Also known as Dye Penetrant Inspection (DPI) or simply Penetrant Testing (PT), this method is used to detect micro-cracks or other defects that could serve as an initiation site for failure. In order to properly execute a penetrant test, the surface of a metal part must be thoroughly clean of any debris, smeared metal, or any amorphous layer that may be hiding a hairline crack thus yielding a false reading.

Posted in: White Papers, Aeronautics, Defense, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials
Read More >>

Researchers Develop Self-Healing, Shape-Changing Smart Material

Washington State University researchers have created a multi-functional smart material that changes shape when subjected to heat or light; the material then assembles and disassembles itself.

Posted in: News, Materials
Read More >>

Customized Masking Solutions Don’t Require Customized Masks

If you’re masking with conventional methods, you know the challenges associated with complex design configurations and need for reliable protection from aggressive chemical processes, high-temperature coatings, or surface treatment processes. Even minute gaps or voids in coverage can result in edge-lift and leakage that can significantly compromise protection and adversely impact your bottom line.

Posted in: White Papers, Materials
Read More >>

Method for Exfoliation of Hexagonal Boron Nitride

Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia

NASA’s Langley Research Center has developed a method for exfoliating commercially available hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) into nanosheets a few atomic layers thick. Currently, hBN has limited use because it is insoluble with limited dispersibility, despite hBN having excellent thermal conductivity and electrical insulation. Langley’s novel method provides for exfoliated hBN nanosheets that are soluble or suspendable in a variety of solvents, allowing for their bulk preparation and incorporation into composites, coatings, and films.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials, Coatings, colorants, and finishes, Composite materials, Conductivity, Insulation, Nanomaterials
Read More >>

Sucrose-Treated Carbon Nanotube and Graphene Yarns and Sheets

Applications include structural materials for aerospace vehicles, space habitats, and lightweight but mechanically robust consumer devices.

Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia

NASA’s Langley Research Center has developed a method to consolidate carbon nanotube yarns and woven sheets and graphene sheets via the dehydration of sucrose. The resulting materials are lightweight and high strength. Sucrose is relatively inexpensive and readily available; therefore the process is cost-effective.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials, Fibers, Materials properties, Nanomaterials
Read More >>

Method for Manufacturing a Thin Film Structural System

Applications include Earth- and space-based inflatable structures, and chemical and radiation sensors.

Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia

NASA’s Langley Research Center has developed a technology that uses commercially available additive print manufacturing to add various levels of structural hierarchy to thin-film surfaces. The approach adds very little mass to thin films, but provides substantial performance enhancements, such as increased damage tolerance to tearing and ripping. NASA developed this technology to provide new and improved ways to produce robust, ultra-lightweight space structures such as solar sails, solar shades, and antennas. Beyond space applications, the technology is well suited for other thin-film applications.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials, Additive manufacturing, Lightweight materials
Read More >>

The U.S. Government does not endorse any commercial product, process, or activity identified on this web site.