Materials & Coatings

Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids for Electrochemical Capacitors

A document discusses room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) used as electrolytes in carbon-nanotube-based, electrochemical, double-layer capacitors. Unlike the previous electrolyte (EtNB4 in acetonitrile), the RTIL used here does not produce cyanide upon thermal decomposition and does not have a moisture sensitivity.

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Yb14MnSb11 as a High- Efficiency Thermoelectric Material

This material could supplant the state-of-theart material, SiGe. Yb14MnSb11 has been found to be well-suited for use as a p-type thermoelectric material in applications that involve hot-side temperatures in the approximate range of 1,200 to 1,300 K. The figure of merit that characterizes the thermal-to-electric power-conversion efficiency is greater for this material than for SiGe, which, until now, has been regarded as the state-of-the art high-temperature p-type thermoelectric material. Moreover, relative to SiGe, Yb14MnSb11 is better suited to incorporation into a segmented thermoelectric leg that includes the moderate-temperature p-type thermoelectric material CeFe4Sb12 and possibly other, lower-temperature p-type thermoelectric materials.

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Polyimide-Foam/Aerogel Composites for Thermal Insulation

These composites may also afford enhanced acoustic attenuation. Composites of specific types of polymer foams and aerogel particles or blankets have been proposed to obtain thermal insulation performance superior to those of the neat polyimide foams. These composites have potential to also provide enhanced properties for vibration dampening or acoustic attenuation. The specific type of polymer foam is denoted “TEEK-H,” signifying a series, denoted “H,” within a family of polyimide foams that were developed at NASA’s Langley Research Center and are collectively denoted “TEEK” (an acronym of the inventors’ names).

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Use of Atomic Oxygen for Increased Water Contact Angles of Various Polymers for Biomedical Applications

Improved polymer hydrophilicity is beneficial for cell culturing and implant growth. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of atomic oxygen (AO) exposure on the hydrophilicity of nine different polymers for biomedical applications. Atomic oxygen treatment can alter the chemistry and morphology of polymer surfaces, which may increase the adhesion and spreading of cells on Petri dishes and enhance implant growth. Therefore, nine different polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen and water-contact angle, or hydrophilicity, was measured after exposure. To determine whether hydrophilicity remains static after initial atomic oxygen exposure, or changes with higher fluence exposures, the contact angles between the polymer and water droplet placed on the polymer’s surface were measured versus AO fluence. The polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen in a 100-W, 13.56-MHz radio frequency (RF) plasma asher, and the treatment was found to significantly alter the hydrophilicity of non-fluorinated polymers.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Briefs, TSP, Briefs, TSP, Coatings & Adhesives

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Convergence Nanoparticles for Multi-Modal Biomedical Imaging

This technique enables detection, sensing, navigation, and actuation in a single nanosystem. A project is underway to develop a novel, versatile, multi-functional convergence nanoparticle system that utilizes inorganic nanoparticles for advanced biomedical applications. Inorganic nanoparticles exhibit improved optical, magnetic, and electronic properties compared to classical bulk materials, making them useful as key components for futuristic nano-device applications.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Briefs, TSP, Briefs, TSP, Coatings & Adhesives, Diagnostics

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Droplet-Based Production of Liposomes

A process for making monodisperse liposomes having lipid bilayer membranes involves fewer, simpler process steps than do related prior methods. First, a microfluidic, cross-junction droplet generator is used to produce vesicles comprising aqueous-solution droplets contained in single-layer lipid membranes. The vesicles are collected in a lipid-solvent mix that is at most partially soluble in water and is less dense than is water. A layer of water is dispensed on top of the solvent. By virtue of the difference in densities, the water sinks to the bottom and the solvent floats to the top. The vesicles, which have almost the same density as that of water, become exchanged into the water instead of floating to the top. As there are excess lipids in the solvent solution, in order for the vesicles to remain in the water, the addition of a second lipid layer to each vesicle is energetically favored.

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Amorphous Silk Fibroin Membranes for Separation of CO2

Amorphous silk fibroin has shown promise as a polymeric material derivable from natural sources for making membranes for use in removing CO2 from mixed-gas streams. For most applications of silk fibroin, for purposes other than gas separation, this material is used in its highly crystalline, nearly natural form because this form has uncommonly high tensile strength. However, the crystalline phase of silk fibroin is impermeable, making it necessary to convert the material to amorphous form to obtain the high permeability needed for gas separation.

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