Mechanical Components

9 questions to ask when specifying a slewing ring bearing

In applications where a bearing must support a rotating structure (e.g. cranes, radar, tank turrets), premature failure can put people and equipment at risk. Designers choosing a slewing ring bearing for such applications should consider many factors, such as the bearing’s support structure, mounting (including bolt strength, tensioning and hole patterns), installation, and even storage. A new white paper from Kaydon Bearings, an SKF Group company, details nine key questions to ask when specifying a slewing ring bearing.

Posted in: Mechanical Components, White Papers

Read More >>

Reverse Engineering

Finding replacement metal bellows components is easier with Servometer's time saving reverse engineering guidelines. Download White Paper Reverse Engineering guidelines Today's design engineers often find themselves in the uncomfortable predicament of replacing legacy parts or parts that have become obsolete. This predicament is often the result of undocumented drawings, part numbers, or specifications. In many cases, the original designer is no longer available. Whatever the reasons, it is often the job of the design engineer to propose a solution using outdated technology and resources or insufficient information. This paper offers hands on reverse engineering guidelines and provides a solution to finding the ideal replacement bellows for your application.

Posted in: Mechanical Components, White Papers

Read More >>

Electroforming Basics

Electroforming is the process of depositing thin layers of metal onto a mandrel through electroplating, dissolving the mandrel chemically, and leaving the plating as the final electroformed product. Learn how electroformed components are manufactured and how they can be applied to a variety of applications.

Posted in: Mechanical Components, White Papers

Read More >>

Lubricant Selection: What Every Design Engineer Needs to Know

Simply stated, lubrication refers to the age-old science of friction reduction. People have been using lubricants for thousands of years, experimenting with waxes and oils from vegetables, fish, and animals to move heavy materials with equipment designed to gain mechanical advantage. In more recent years, the discovery of petroleum oil in the 1800s ushered in a new era of lubrication developments as people learned how to refine this oil and use it for a variety of purposes. Machinery could now be developed to operate faster and under heavier loads by using lubricants to create a barrier that eliminates friction and metalon- metal contact.

Posted in: Materials, Mechanical Components, Machinery & Automation, White Papers

Read More >>

The Ultimate Shaft-To-Hub Connection

Polygon Shapes - Multi-Faceted Problem Solvers Kinematically ground polygonal shapes have been used as drive connections for more than 45 years. What is now referred to as Polygon Systems was developed by Fortunawerke, Stuttgart, West Germany, who patented a grinding machine capable of producing matched polygonal shaft and bore diameters.

Posted in: Mechanics, Mechanical Components, White Papers

Read More >>

The Basics Of Pressure Regulators

Pressure regulators are found in many common home and industrial applications. For example, pressure regulators are used in gas grills to regulate propane pressure, in home furnaces to regulate natural gas, in medical/dental equipment regulate oxygen and anesthesia gases, in pneumatic automation systems to regulate compressed air, in engines to regulate fuel pressure, and in fuel cells to regulate hydrogen. Although the applications vary considerably, the pressure regulators provide the same function. Pressure regulators reduce a supply pressure to a lower outlet pressure and they maintain this outlet pressure regardless of inlet pressure fluctuations. This reduction in pressure is the key characteristic of pressure regulators; outlet pressure is always at a pressure below the inlet pressure.

Posted in: Mechanical Components, White Papers

Read More >>

Advanced Symbolic and Numeric Techniques for Machine Vibration Analysis

The operational reliability of a rotary equipment train is dependent on the vibration of its components. Often, the only evidence of this vibration is gear noise or coupling wear. However, these early indicators might eventually develop into high-amplitude vibration, resulting in gear wear, gear tooth failures, or broken shafts. The torsional response characteristics of rotating and reciprocating equipment should therefore be analyzed and evaluated to ensure system reliability.

Posted in: Mechanical Components, White Papers

Read More >>