Health, Medicine, & Biotechnology

Laser Treatment Supports New Paper Electronics

By using lasers to treat graphene, Iowa State University researchers have found new ways to enable flexible, wearable, and low-cost electronics. Fabricating inkjet-printed, multi-layer graphene electric circuits and electrodes with a pulsed-laser process improves electrical conductivity without damaging paper, polymers, or other fragile printing surfaces.

Posted in: News, News, Diagnostics

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Inkjet Technology Prints 'Soft Robot' Circuits

A new potential manufacturing approach from Purdue University researchers harnesses inkjet printing to create devices made of liquid alloys. The resulting stretchable electronics are compatible with soft machines, such as robots that must squeeze through small spaces, or wearable electronics.

Posted in: News, News, Surgical Robotics/Instruments

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New Method Generates High-Resolution, Moving Holograms in 3D

The 3D effect produced by stereoscopic glasses used to watch movies cannot provide perfect depth cues. Furthermore, it is not possible to move one’s head and observe that objects appear different from different angles — a real-life effect known as motion parallax. Researchers have developed a new way of generating high-resolution, full-color, 3D videos that uses holographic technology. Holograms are considered to be truly 3D, because they allow the viewer to see different perspectives of a reconstructed 3D object from different angles and locations. Holograms are created using lasers, which can produce the complex light interference patterns, including spatial data, required to re-create a complete 3D object. To enhance the resolution of holographic videos, researchers used an array of spatial light modulators (SLMs). SLMs are used to display hologram pixels and create 3D objects by light diffraction. Each SLM can display up to 1.89 billion hologram pixels every second. Source:

Posted in: News, Imaging, Video, Medical

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Implantable Neurostimulator Alleviates Dry Eye

Stanford Biodesign fellows are testing two tiny devices that stimulate natural tear production. The technologies deliver micro-electrical pulses to the lacrimal gland.

Posted in: News, News, Implants & Prosthetics

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Wearable Nanowire Sensors Monitor Electrophysiological Signals

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new, wearable sensor that uses silver nanowires to monitor electrophysiological signals, such as electrocardiography (EKG) or electromyography (EMG). The new sensor is as accurate as the “wet electrode” sensors used in hospitals, but can be used for long-term monitoring and when a patient is moving.

Posted in: News, News, Electronic Components, Electronics & Computers, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Nanotechnology, Semiconductors & ICs, Sensors

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Technology Diagnoses Brain Damage from Concussions, Strokes, and Dementia

New optical diagnostic technology developed at Tufts University School of Engineering promises new ways to identify and monitor brain damage resulting from traumatic injury, stroke, or vascular dementia in real time and without invasive procedures.

Posted in: News, Electronic Components, Electronics & Computers, Diagnostics, Medical, Fiber Optics, Optics, Photonics, Semiconductors & ICs, Measuring Instruments, Test & Measurement

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Robotic Walker Helps Patients Regain Natural Gait

Researchers from the National University of Singapore have invented a novel robotic walker that helps patients carry out physical therapy sessions to regain their leg movements and natural gait. The system also increases productivity of physiotherapists, and improves the quality of rehabilitation sessions. The walker can support a patient’s weight while providing the right amount of force at the pelvis to help the patient walk with a natural gait.

Posted in: News, Medical, Rehabilitation & Physical Therapy

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