Medical

Instantly Capture, Edit, and Store Medical Images via Online Applications

Online tool allows user to conveniently capture and manage images from medical devices. A new image capture software development kit (SDK), called the Dynamic Web TWAIN, allows the simplified creation of an online tool to manage images of patient records. It enables image application providers to deliver a method to capture images from medical devices, such as intraoral cameras and digital x-ray equipment, and then send the medical images to a central web server. Such medical image captures can be sent alongside a patient’s identification, results data, applied treatments, next visit schedules, and more. An SDK allows implementation within popular Internet browsers, including Internet Explorer, Chrome, Firefox, Safari, or Opera. (See Figure 1)

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Software, Imaging & Diagnostics, Visualization Software, Imaging, Medical, Diagnostics, Briefs, MDB

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New Blood Pressure Connectors Prevent Misconnects

Fittings make quick connections easier and safer, even in low-light situations. Healthcare professionals use medical devices in a variety of settings and situations from urgent to routine. In an emergency, any sort of confusion, hindrance, or hesitation concerning the most minor detail or part of a device can mean a matter of life or death. As a result, there is a constant battle among medical device manufacturers to develop products with superior ergonomics, risk-free designs, and the ability to meet extensive technical requirements—all while maintaining a reasonable profit margin. In response to these concerns, Value Plastics has developed a new line of quick connect fittings. Their BPL Series of tubing connectors incorporates a number of features that are not only aimed at meeting engineers’ needs but also designed to ease users’ stress and frustration that can arise from use in critical situations.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Drug Delivery & Dispensing, Materials / Adhesives / Coatings, Mechanical Components, Materials, Plastics, Medical, Briefs, MDB

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Transferrable Sensor Tattoo Measures Metabolic Stress

Smiley sensor works like a temporary tattoo to detect disease. A medical sensor, that adheres to the skin like a temporary tattoo could make it easier for doctors to detect metabolic problems in patients as well as help coaches to fine-tune athletes’ training routines, say researchers at the Department of Physical & Environ mental Sciences at the University of Toronto, Scarborough, Canada (UTSC). The entire sensor was designed as a thin, flexible package shaped like a smiley face.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Materials / Adhesives / Coatings, Biosensors, Medical, Briefs, MDB

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Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

Deinococcus phoenicis sp. nov. can be used as an indicator for sterilization processes in food, aerospace, medical, and pharmaceutical applications. There is a growing concern that desiccation and extreme radiation-resistant, non-spore-forming microorganisms associated with spacecraft surfaces can withstand space environmental conditions and subsequent proliferation on another solar body. Such forward contamination would jeopardize future life detection or sample return technologies. The prime focus of NASA’s planetary protection efforts is the development of strategies for inactivating resistance-bearing microorganisms. Eradi cation techniques can be designed to target resistance-conferring microbial populations by first identifying and understanding their physiologic and biochemical capabilities that confers its elevated tolerance (as is being studied in Deinococcus phoenicis, as a result of this description). Furthermore, hospitals, food, and government agencies frequently use biological indicators to ensure the efficacy of a wide range of radiation-based sterilization processes. Due to their resistance to a variety of perturbations, the non-spore forming D. phoenicis may be a more appropriate biological indicator than those currently in use.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Monitoring & Testing, Medical, Briefs, MDB

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Porcupine Quills Aid Device Design

Understanding the mechanisms behind quill penetration and extraction could help engineers design better medical devices. Once a porcupine’s quill penetrates your skin, it’s very difficult to remove. That’s the inspiration behind research at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, to develop new types of adhesives, needles, and other medical devices.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Drug Delivery & Dispensing, Materials / Adhesives / Coatings, Medical, Briefs, MDB

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Self-Charging Power Cell for Small Devices

A hybrid power cell uses a new technique for electrical charge conversion and storage. Scientists at Georgia Tech say that they have developed a new self-charging power cell technology that directly converts mechanical energy to chemical energy. Then, the power is stored until it is needed to generate electricity. This hybrid generator- storage cell utilizes mechanical energy more efficiently than systems using separate generators and batteries, they say.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Electronics, Batteries, Electronic Components, Power Supplies, Medical, Briefs, MDB

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Navigating the Intellectual Property Roadblocks to Open Innovation

In an effort to incorporate outside sources of innovation into their new product acquisition programs, there has been a significant increase in the number of firms opening their organizational boundaries to external ideas. Over the past few years, large multinational companies such as Kraft, IBM and 3M have initiated active open innovation (OI) programs. The benefits to the organization of accepting new product ideas are lower research and development costs and the more rapid procurement of new products to fuel sales, and to the submitter, this can be financially rewarding if their idea is selected for product development or commercialization. Consumer products giant Procter & Gamble estimates that as many as 1.5 million researchers and scientists could contribute materially to the efforts of their own 7,500 researchers and scientists in corporate research and development. However, the economic benefits of open innovation can be diminished if organizations do not effectively manage the legal issues and logistical challenges that are presented. They include the quality/quantity of submissions, and once received, what is the most efficient way to process the submissions received?

Posted in: Medical, White Papers

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