Motion Control

All Motors are Stepping Motors

In 1938, General Electric began producing a two-phase synchronous induction motor which, at 60 Hz, ran at 75 RPM. The low speed resulted from using a different number of rotors to stator poles or teeth, which made the motor a good bi-directional control motor. This motor was used by Superior Electric Company of Bristol, CT, to run power driven autotransformers used to dim lights in auditoriums and similar applications. General Electric ceased producing this motor in the mid 1950’s due to slow sales.

Posted in: Features, Articles

Read More >>

Intelligent Control Increases Motion System ROI

The economic realities of the industrial marketplace are driving machine builders and integrators to get creative and build more intelligence into their machines in order to increase productivity and lower lifecycle cost. This is done by minimizing time to communicate with the motion controller, and by setting up and optimizing the closed-loop controls that squeezes the last few unneeded time cycles from a machine operation. Therefore, by looking at how a motion controller connects, controls, and can optimize a system, the best performance per dollar invested can often be accomplished.

Posted in: Features, Articles

Read More >>

Tips On Selecting Custom Gearmotors

A custom gearmotor is one that meets your particular specifications. It has the correct mechanical and electrical interfaces, fits within the envelope available, meets your performance, maintenance, lifetime, and aftermarket criteria, and fits within your budget.

Posted in: Features, Articles

Read More >>

Intelligent Motor Control ICs Simplify System Design

A new category of IC called an intelligent motor controller (IMC) is evolving that simplifies the task of designing high performance motor control drives. IMCs are dedicated, highspeed ICs that control multi-phase motors such as brushless DC and AC induction motors, and provide sophisticated control features required by today’s energy-efficient applications such as variable speed, flux vector control, and even sensorless control.

Posted in: Features, Articles

Read More >>

Electric Actuators Deliver Energy Efficient, Low Maintenance Solutions

Machine designers and end users find themselves balancing sometimes opposing priorities such as improving energy efficiency while minimizing adverse impact on the environment, at the same time ensuring performance (e.g., precision, reliability) is not compromised. A key trend towards meeting the challenges has been to shift from hydraulic actuation towards electric actuation, especially in applications characterized by high degree of responsiveness, space constraints, high uptime/low maintenance, low energy consumption, and minimal environmental impact.

Posted in: Features, Articles

Read More >>

Computer-Assisted Laser Treatment Using Real-Time Retinal Tracking

This computerized system accurately guides laser shots to diseased retinal areas. Diabetic retinopathy resulting from long-term diabetes mellitus is one of the common diseases that leads to choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a leading cause of blindness. Among the currently available treatment methods, a laser can be used to photocoagulate the diseased areas. Several thousand laser shots are usually required during such treatment. Special care must be taken to avoid hitting the blood vessel tree, the macula, the optic disk, and the region among them. For a single eye, this procedure requires up to several hours that are usually divided over many treatment sessions. Consequently, the development of an accurate laser treatment guidance system to treat the whole retina in one session would improve the effectiveness of such procedures.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Briefs, TSP, Briefs, TSP, Lasers & Laser Systems, Photonics

Read More >>

Introduction to Linear Actuators

Students trained in classic mechanical engineering are taught to construct a system using conventional mechanical components to convert rotary into linear motion. Converting rotary to linear motion can be accomplished by several mechanical means using a rotary motor, rack and pinion, belt and pulley, and other mechanical linkages, which require many components to couple and align. Although these methods can be effective, they each carry certain limitations.

Posted in: Features, Articles

Read More >>

White Papers

Lubrication Considerations for Bearings
Sponsored by ast bearings
The Ultimate Shaft-To-Hub Connection
Sponsored by Stoffel Polygon
Engaging stakeholders in the home medical device market
Sponsored by bsi
Thinking Outside of the Box: Optimizing System Design With Embedded Expertise
Sponsored by Curtiss Wright
Learn LED Test Techniques
Sponsored by Keithley
Magnetics Design: Specification, Performance & Economics
Sponsored by Datatronics

White Papers Sponsored By: