Photonics/Optics

3D AOI Inspection System

Saki Corporation (San Jose, CA) has debuted its 3rd-generation 3D automated optical inspection (AOI) line that accommodates dual lanes, XXL sizes, and increases throughput by 15%. Saki’s new BF- 3Di-D (dual lane) and BF-3Di-Z (extra-large platform) 3D AOI equipment provides measurements of components with a height range between 0 and 20 mm, achieving 1-micron height resolution, a false call rate of less than 100 ppm with 0 escapes, and an increased positioning speed of 50%. The new camera and lighting systems capture extremely clear, detailed images with no shadowing for inspection of the most difficult defects, such as lifted leads, tombstones, reverses, and height variations. For Free Info Visit http://info.hotims.com/61059-221

Posted in: Products, Imaging, Photonics

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NASA Engineers Tapped to Build First Integrated-Photonics Modem

A NASA team has been tapped to build a new type of communications modem that will employ an emerging, potentially revolutionary technology that could transform everything from telecommunications, medical imaging, and advanced manufacturing to national defense. The space agency’s first-ever integrated-photonics modem will be tested aboard the International Space Station beginning in 2020 as part of NASA’s multi-year Laser Communications Relay Demonstration, or LCRD.The cell phone-sized device incorporates optics-based functions, such as lasers, switches, and wires, onto a microchip — much like an integrated circuit found in all electronics hardware. Once aboard the space station, the so-called Integrated LCRD LEO (Low-Earth Orbit) User Modem and Amplifier (ILLUMA) will serve as a low-Earth orbit terminal for NASA’s LCRD, demonstrating yet another capability for high-speed, laser-based communications.

Posted in: Articles, News, Photonics

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The Dusk of Fire-Wire, The Dawn of USB 3.0: Advancements and critical aspects of camera interfaces for next generation vision systems

Before 2011, many system designs were built on the most popular interface at the time: FireWire. This technology is slowly becoming obsolete and is commonly being replaced by USB 3.0, the new predominant interface for industrial and scientific cameras. In this paper we will outline why people are making the upgrade from FireWire to the USB 3.0 interface, and why USB 3.0 is here to stay.

Posted in: White Papers, Imaging, Medical, Optics, Photonics

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Thermal Cycle Qualification of Radiated Solar Arrays for 50 to 133 K Temperatures in Vacuum

A closed loop system needs no liquid helium. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California Solar arrays (radiated or non-radiated) and other technologies are candidate materials for projects in JPL. Some of the projects need to qualify these potential technologies to cryogenic extreme temperatures (from 133 to 50 K or lower). Those technologies need to survive for more than 120 thermal cycles in a thermal vacuum environment to meet three times mission life of the ECM project per JPL design principles. There is not any published thermal cycling qualification data for solar arrays in vacuum to those of cryogenic temperatures. Therefore, an experimental assessment study was undertaken on behalf of the JPL pre-project office for the proposed Europa Clipper mission.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Imaging, Photonics, Solar energy, Thermal management, Thermal testing

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Downhole Regolith Interrogation with Helium-Assisted Drill and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama It is of great interest to the scientific community to have the ability to analyze drilled boreholes in situ on the surfaces of the Moon and Mars. The goal of this work was to design and fabricate a Downhole Regolith Interrogation with Helium-assisted Drill and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) system (DIHeDRAL) targeted towards such applications. A DIHeDRAL instrument would provide synchronous exposure and analysis of volatiles using laser pulses, preserve borehole stratigraphy information, assess regolith mechanical properties through drilling telemetry, and analyze sensitive elemental composition.

Posted in: Briefs, Imaging, Photonics, Lasers, Spectroscopy, Soils, Drilling, Spacecraft

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Large, High-Speed, Precision Optic Indexing Wheel

New wheel would enable more observational modes to be done in a given time. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California Optical indexing wheels, sometimes called “filter wheels,” are used to locate various optics or filters in a beam path to change the observational mode. Large wheels a half-meter in size or larger typically operate slowly, although the loss of a few seconds of time moving from one observation mode to another is not an issue. In certain rare applications, it is desirable to index between a large selection of optics at a faster rate. If the device is intended for space use, the power requirement becomes critical as well. Current indexing wheel designs typically use a central direct-drive motor to avoid the complication of gears, but these designs will draw too much power and work too slowly for certain applications. They also may require an ultrahigh bit encoder to achieve required positioning accuracy. Designers of such devices would readily admit that speed and power efficiency are both increased through the use of a gear reduction, but generally see the use of gears as problematic.

Posted in: Briefs, Imaging, Photonics, Wheels, Optics, Gears

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Web-Based Search Service to Support Imaging Spectrometer Instrument Operations

An adaptive matched-filter approach compensates for the context and background characteristics of each scene. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California Imaging spectrometers yield rich and informative data products, but interpreting them demands time and expertise. There is a continual need for new algorithms and methods for rapid firstdraft analyses to assist analysts during instrument operations. Intelligent data analyses can summarize scenes to draft geologic maps, searching images to direct operator attention to key features. This validates data quality while facilitating rapid tactical decision-making to select follow-up targets. Ideally, these algorithms would operate in seconds, never grow bored, and be free from observation bias about the kinds of mineralogy that will be found.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Imaging, Photonics, Mathematical analysis, Internet, Spectroscopy, Data management

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