RF & Microwave Electronics

Eliminate Risk of Contention and Data Corruption in RS-485 Communications

The RS-485 communications standard was introduced in 1983 by the Electronic Industries Alliance (EIA) as a two-wire, half-duplex, multi-drop alternative to the point-to-point RS-232 interface. (Note: RS-485 can also be wired using 4-wires to enable full-duplex communication). RS-485 uses differential signaling to allow up to 32 devices to communicate peer-to-peer at distances up to 4000 feet. In most RS-485 configurations two signals, a positive and a negative, are run as a twisted pair. Since these signals are compared to one another rather than a ground reference like RS-232, RS-485 communication is less susceptible to external noise injected on the wiring and performs more reliably in industrial environments.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, RF & Microwave Electronics, White Papers

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Wireless Tags Quickly Provide Details About Orthopedic Implants

A non-invasive system employing radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology is designed to give physicians easy access to information about implants and patients. Radio-frequency technology that uses human tissue instead of air as a conduit for radio waves is the basis of the first electronic “tag” system designed to track and monitor orthopedic implants. A 2009 RAND Corporation (Europe) technical report found that RFID technology offers several advantages to medical care in such areas as wireless data transfer and patient/object identification, and as a sensor.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Implants & Prosthetics, Medical, Orthopedics, RF & Microwave Electronics, Briefs, MDB

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