RF & Microwave Electronics

Microwave Radar Sensor Module

Applications include detection of humans from a distance for search and rescue, and non-contact detection of a patient’s vital signs. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California Existing implementations of continuous wave (CW) radar are not packaged appropriately for use as part of a heartbeat detection system for disaster search and rescue. They use separately packaged microwave components and laboratory test equipment, and require substantial skill to operate properly, including setup, calibration, and interpretation of the data.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Sensors


E-Textile Interconnect

Devices constructed from e-textiles have applications in law enforcement, by first-responders, and in wireless communications and computing. Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas E-textiles have shown great promise within the microwave and antenna community to provide a low-mass, highly conformal option that integrates extremely well with fabric-based microwave devices and antenna platforms, but often not as well with more conventional devices.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Antennas


E-Textile Antenna Tuning Stitches

This technique can be used to tune a microstrip patch antenna. Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas A variety of antenna tuning techniques exist for conventionally constructed antenna structures, such that when an antenna is converted from a design to an actual fabricated structure, slight adjustments can be made to the fabricated structure to match the performance expected from the design. For microstrip antenna structures, for example, shorting pins may be added to adjust the resonant frequency of the structure, or the conducting top layer of the antenna may be intentionally constructed in a fashion such that portions of it may be removed in post-production tuning.

Posted in: Articles, Briefs, TSP, Antennas


A Continuous-Flow, Microfluidic, Microwave-Assisted Chemical Reactor

The reactor uses a directed 60-GHz source, which may require far less power to observe the same reactivity profiles. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California In industrial synthetic chemistry laboratories, reactions are generally carried out using batch-mode methodologies, stepwise reactions, and purifications to generate a final product. Each step has an associated yield of both the reaction itself and of the final purification that is largely dependent on the procedure being used, and the scientist carrying out the procedure. Continuous-flow reactors are one way of streamlining the process. Furthermore, microwave-enhanced, or microwave-assisted, chemistry has been demonstrated to aid in many of these areas; however, scaling has been a traditional problem with this technique.

Posted in: Articles, Briefs, TSP


Wireless Tags Quickly Provide Details About Orthopedic Implants

A non-invasive system employing radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology is designed to give physicians easy access to information about implants and patients. Radio-frequency technology that uses human tissue instead of air as a conduit for radio waves is the basis of the first electronic “tag” system designed to track and monitor orthopedic implants. A 2009 RAND Corporation (Europe) technical report found that RFID technology offers several advantages to medical care in such areas as wireless data transfer and patient/object identification, and as a sensor.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Briefs, Briefs, Implants & Prosthetics, Orthopedics