Semiconductors & ICs

Compact, Single-Stage MMIC InP HEMT Amplifier

This amplifier exhibits gain of 5 dB at 340 GHz. Figure 1 depicts a monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) single-stage amplifier containing an InP-based high- electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) plus coplanar-waveguide (CPW) transmission lines for impedance matching and input and output coupling, all in a highly miniaturized layout as needed for high performance at operating frequencies of hundreds of gigahertz. This is one in a series of devices that are intermediate products of a continuing effort to develop advanced MMIC amplifiers for sub-millimeter-wavelength imaging systems, scientific instrumentation, heterodyne receivers, and other applications.

Posted in: Semiconductors & ICs, Briefs

Read More >>

MEMS/ECD Method for Making Bi2–xSbxTe3 Thermoelectric Devices

Devices containing diverse materials in complex three-dimensional shapes can be fabricated. A method of fabricating Bi2–xSbxTe3-based thermoelectric microdevices involves a combination of (1) techniques used previously in the fabrication of integrated circuits and of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and (2) a relatively inexpensive MEMS-oriented electrochemical- deposition (ECD) technique. The devices and the method of fabrication at an earlier stage of development were reported in “Sub milli meter-Sized Bi2–xSbxTe3 Thermoelectric Devices” (NPO-20472), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 24, No. 5 (May 2000), page 44. To recapitulate: A device of this type generally contains multiple pairs of n- and p-type Bi2–xSbxTe3 legs connected in series electrically and in parallel thermally. The Bi2–xSbxTe3 legs have typical dimensions of the order of tens of microns. Metal contact pads and other non-thermoelectric parts of the devices are fabricated by conventional integrated-circuit and MEMS fabrication techniques. The Bi2–xSbxTe3 thermoelectric legs are formed by electrodeposition, through holes in photoresist masks, onto the contact pads.

Posted in: Semiconductors & ICs, Briefs

Read More >>

Low-Temperature Supercapacitors

Electrolyte compositions are designed to extend the low-temperature operational limit. An effort to extend the low-temperature operational limit of supercapacitors is currently underway. At present, commercially available non-aqueous supercapacitors are rated for a minimum operating temperature of –40 °C. A capability to operate at lower temperatures would be desirable for delivering power to systems that must operate in outer space or in the Polar Regions on Earth.

Posted in: Semiconductors & ICs, Briefs

Read More >>

Radiation-Insensitive Inverse Majority Gates

These gates would be implemented as microscopic vacuum electronic devices. To help satisfy a need for high-density logic circuits insensitive to radiation, it has been proposed to realize inverse majority gates as microscopic vacuum electronic devices. In comparison with solid-state electronic devices ordinarily used in logic circuits, vacuum electronic devices are inherently much less adversely affected by radiation and extreme temperatures.

Posted in: Semiconductors & ICs, Briefs

Read More >>

Dual-Input AND Gate From Single-Channel Thin-Film FET

These transistors show potential as large-area, low-cost electronic circuitry on rigid and flexible substrates. A regio-regular poly (3-hexylthiophene) (RRP3HT) thin-film transistor having a split-gate architecture has been fabricated on a doped silicon/silicon nitride substrate and characterized. RRP3HT is a semiconducting polymer that has a carrier mobility and on/off ratio when used in a field effect transistor (FET) configuration. This commercially available polymer is very soluble in common organic solvents and is easily processed to form uniform thin films. The most important polymer-based device fabricated and studied is the FET, since it forms the building block in logic circuits and switches for active matrix (light-emitting-diode) (LED) displays, smart cards, and radio frequency identification (RFID) cards.

Posted in: Semiconductors & ICs, Briefs

Read More >>

Split-Block Waveguide Polarization Twist for 220 to 325 GHz

This device is superior to conventional twisted rectangular waveguides for submillimeter wavelengths. Figure 1. A Channel Having Asymmetric Steps is cut into the lower block.An identical channel is cut into the upper block. Then with the help ofalignment pins, the blocks are assembled so that the two channels mergeinto one channel that makes a transition between two orthogonal orientationsof a WR-3 waveguide.A split-block waveguide circuit that rotates polarization by 90° has been designed with WR-3 input and output waveguides, which are rectangular waveguides used for a nominal frequency range of 220 to 325 GHz. Heretofore, twisted rectangular waveguides equipped with flanges at the input and output have been the standard means of rotating the polarizations of guided microwave signals. However, the fabrication and assembly of such components become difficult at high frequency due to decreasing wavelength, such that twisted rectangular waveguides become impractical at frequencies above a few hundred gigahertz. Conventional twisted rectangular waveguides are also not amenable to integration into highly miniaturized subassemblies of advanced millimeter- and submillimeter- wave detector arrays now undergoing development. In contrast, the present polarization-rotating waveguide can readily be incorporated into complex integrated waveguide circuits such as miniaturized detector arrays fabricated by either conventional end milling of metal blocks or by deep reactive ion etching of silicon blocks. Moreover, the present splitblock design can be scaled up in frequency to at least 5 THz.

Posted in: Semiconductors & ICs, Briefs

Read More >>

Error-Detecting Counters for FPGA and ASIC State Machines

Inconsistencies between main and auxiliary counts would be detected. Error-detecting counters have been proposed as parts of fault-tolerant finite state machines that could be implemented in field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and application-specific integrated circuits that perform sequential logic functions. The use of error-detecting counters would complement the fault-tolerant coding schemes described in “Fault-Tolerant Coding for State Machines” (NPO-41050), in this issue on page 55. Counters are often used in state machines in cases in which it is necessary to represent large numbers of states and/or to count clock cycles between certain states. To ensure reliability, it is necessary to ensure that the counters are as free of faults as are the other parts of the state machines.

Posted in: Semiconductors & ICs, Briefs

Read More >>

White Papers

Electrical and Mechanical Integration in Aerospace Design
Sponsored by Mentor Graphics
3D Printing with FDM: How it Works
Sponsored by Stratasys
Powering Wearable Technology and the Internet of Everything
Sponsored by Cymbet
White Paper: Computer System Design for Critical Applications
Sponsored by Sealevel
Unique Method for Orifice Production
Sponsored by Bird Precision
Guidelines for Ensuring PCB Manufacturability
Sponsored by Sunstone Circuits

White Papers Sponsored By: