Sensors/Data Acquisition

New System Allows Buildings to 'Sense' Internal Damage

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed a computational model that makes sense of the ambient vibrations that travel up a structure as trucks and other forces rumble by. By picking out specific features in the noise that give indications of a building’s stability, the model may be used to continuously monitor a building for signs of damage or mechanical stress.

Posted in: News, Data Acquisition, Detectors, Sensors


The Economics of Accuracy in Low-cost, High-volume Sensing Applications

Various research firms forecast the market for portable medical devices to be somewhere around the $20 billion-range within the next several years. Part of the increased demand is due to an aging population with more chronic conditions. These smaller portable units requires devices with smaller footprints. By the same token, smaller devices need to provide adequate levels of care to ensure patient safety and comfort. Thus, functionality cannot be sacrificed for space.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, Electronics, Electronics & Computers, Semiconductors & ICs, Data Acquisition, Sensors


Force Sensors in Robotic Design

From the operating room to the manufacturing floor, the robotic industry continues to grow and mature. As demand for robotic devices increases, so do the technology requirements.

Posted in: White Papers, Machinery & Automation, Robotics, Data Acquisition, Sensors, Test & Measurement


Healthy Sensing: Do You Know When Your Proximity Sensor Is Sick?

The age of the fully connected aircraft is upon us and it isn’t coming a minute too soon to meet the demands of today’s commercial aircraft. The integration of smart components helps to increase revenue and reduce the cost to serve. Honeywell has designed and implemented the patented FAVCO (Fixed Amplitude Variable Current Oscillator) technology, which allows for continuous health monitoring capable of detecting the majority of circuit and sensor faults.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, Aerospace, Defense, Sensors


Smartphone Video Guidance Sensor

The need arose to apply the state determination algorithms developed for the Advanced Video Guidance Sensor autonomous rendezvous and docking (AR&D) sensor onto a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS), smartphone-based platform to create a lower-mass, lower-cost sensor for small satellite and CubeSat applications. Prior techniques used for state determination suffer one or more of the following problems: large mass, large volume, high cost, or computationally intensive calculations.

Posted in: Briefs, Tech Briefs, Sensors


Integrated Temperature and Capacitive Ablation Recession Rate Sensors

Innovators at NASA’s Glenn Research Center have developed new sensors that can be integrated into thermal protection systems (TPS) to protect them from environmental damage. Radiation, shock, and ablation (erosion of the protective outer surface) combine to damage the TPS material, so it becomes crucial to determine the temperature and rate at which the TPS material deteriorates. Glenn has developed an improved method to bulk-manufacture silicon carbide (SiC) devices that enables sensors to be manufactured economically. Additionally, this technique permits the simultaneous production of SiC sensors of different types (e.g., pressure sensors, flow sensors, and accelerometers) from the same SiC wafer. Glenn’s development holds great potential for any industry that requires sensors and monitoring of temperature, corrosion, or environmental damage.

Posted in: Briefs, Sensors


Cryogenic Liquid Level Sensor Apparatus and Method

This technology can be used in many medical, industrial, and pharmaceutical applications. Innovators at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center have developed a highly accurate method for measuring liquid levels using optical fibers. Unlike liquid level gauges currently on the market that rely on discrete measurements to give broad approximations of liquid levels, Armstrong’s innovative fiber optic method provides precise and accurate measurements. Specifically, Armstrong’s novel method is capable of providing measurements at 1/4-inch intervals within a tank. This significant leap forward in precision and accuracy in liquid level sensing offers significant benefits to many industries. Originally designed by NASA to monitor a rocket’s cryogenic fuel levels, this technology can be used in many medical, industrial, and pharmaceutical applications.

Posted in: Briefs, Sensors


White Papers

Power Control For Automotive Applications
Sponsored by Maxim Integrated
Optimizing EBM Alloy 718 Material for Aerospace Components
Sponsored by Arcam
Hermetic Feedthroughs Safeguard Mission-Critical Electronics
Sponsored by Douglas Electrical Components
Introduction to Machine Vision
Sponsored by Cognex
Stencil-less Jet Printing for PCB Assembly
Sponsored by Imagineering
RF & MW Control Products in Silicon
Sponsored by Avnet

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