Sensors/Data Acquisition

Shock-Sensing Apparatus

This apparatus enables easy and reliable shock detection and localization in high-speed inlets of aerospace vehicles. John H. Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio Acompact shock-sensing device, which employs an innovative light sheet generator, has been created. The device may be used either as a solo aerodynamic shock detector or in combination with a scanning mode shock sensor. This permits easy detection and tracking of unstable and traveling shocks in supersonic inlets.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Lasers & Laser Systems, Detectors, Sensors

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Development of a Turnkey Clear Air Turbulence Detection System

Turbulence is determined via three infrasonic microphones. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia Currently, the only available means of reporting clear air turbulence (CAT) is the pilot report (PIREP), whereby a pilot experiencing turbulence reports their location and associated data. In this report, a system is proposed that would allow the detection of CAT through infrasonic emissions.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Aviation, Detectors

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RR1P Rugged ATR Pluggable Canister RAID Data Storage Delivers Continuous Data Recording for ISR

RR1P removable canister RAID data storage system enables military ISR data to be removed from a plane, ship or ground vehicle in under two minutes. The canister connects to the ¾ ATR chassis with a military grade connector designed for 10,000 insertion cycles. It weighs only 25 pounds including a five pound removable canister with up to 19.2 TB of compact, rugged, high performance mobile RAID data storage.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, Data Acquisition, Sensors, Electronics & Computers

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Comparison of Interface Pressure Measurement Options

An increasingly competitive global marketplace means that design engineers must efficiently deliver a high quality product. Countless emerging technologies impact the design process and engineers must practice due diligence to ensure analysis tools meet their application’s requirements. This paper focuses specifically on technology for interface force and pressure measurement between two surfaces and includes a review of technology composition and data output. This paper will also examine capabilities driven by form factor, precision and environment that influence selection criteria of interface force and pressure sensors.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, Sensors

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Force Sensors for Design

The Tekscan Force Sensors for Design White Paper provides insights on various force sensing technologies including: Comparison of various force sensing technologies such as load cells, piezoresistive, and capacitive sensors. Discussion of issues including power consumption, size, cost, and durability. Real-life examples of how thin and flexible tactile force sensors have contributed to the success of OEMs in a variety of applications and industries. What to consider in choosing a technology partner, including engineering support, customization, and manufacturing capabilities.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, Sensors

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Multivariate Time Series Search Capability to Identify Complex Patterns in Large Datasets

Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California There exist many datasets that can be viewed as multivariate time series, such as the daily high temperature at a locality, sensor recordings in diagnostic systems and scientific data, and music and video recordings. These time series reside in large repositories, and there is often a need to search for particular time series exhibiting certain types of behaviors. Many current approaches to time series search are too slow on large repositories, or constrain the range of possible queries.

Posted in: Briefs, Data Acquisition, Mathematical/Scientific Software

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NGDCS Linux Application for Imaging-Spectrometer Data Acquisition and Display

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California A simple method of controlling recording and display of imaging spectrometer data in (airborne) flight was needed. Existing commercial packages were overly complicated, and sometimes difficult to operate in a bouncing plane. The software also was required to keep up with the imaging data rate, while still running on commodity hardware and a desktop operating system. Finally, the software needed to be as robust as possible — repeating a flight because of lost data is sometimes impossible, and always expensive.

Posted in: Briefs, Displays/Monitors/HMIs, Data Acquisition

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