Sensors

Development of a Low- Cost, Portable Biosensor for Blood Protein Detection

This innovation offers a high level of medical diagnostic sensing abilities comparable to more costly clinical instrumentation. Current blood testing procedures are expensive and time consuming, and the equipment required is often bulky and difficult to transport. A new low-cost, portable technique has been developed to quickly and reliably detect specific proteins in a sample of human blood. The technique, described in the Sept. 1, 2011 issue of the Optical Society’s (OSA) open-access journal, Biomedical Optics Express, could help in a wide range of medical sensing applications, including diagnosing diseases like cancer and diabetes long before clinical symptoms arise.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Imaging & Diagnostics, Monitoring & Testing, Biosensors, Sensors, Medical, Diagnostics, Briefs, MDB

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Mini-Sensor Measures Magnetic Activity in Human Brain

A recent study indicates that the technology may be used in magnetoencephalography (MEG), a noninvasive procedure that could advance the study of neurological diseases. A miniature atom-based magnetic sensor has passed an important research milestone by successfully measuring human brain activity. Experiments verified the sensor's potential for biomedical applications such as studying mental processes and advancing the understanding of neurological diseases.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Imaging, Sensors, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Briefs, MDB

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Ultra-Sensitive Biosensor for Medical Diagnostics

This device may enable miniaturization and new point-of-care applications in doctors' offices. Researchers have created an ultrasensitive biosensor that could open up new opportunities for early detection of cancer and “personalized medicine” tailored to the specific biochemistry of individual patients. The device, which could be several hundred times more sensitive than other biosensors, combines the attributes of two distinctly different types of sensors, said Muhammad A. Alam, a Purdue Uni versity professor of electrical and computer engineering.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Electronic Components, Sensors, Medical, Diagnostics, Briefs, MDB

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Underwater Solar Cells?

Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Electronics Science and Technology Division, have developed high-band-gap solar cells capable of producing sufficient power to operate electronic sensor systems at water depths of 9 meters.

Posted in: Electronics, Power Management, Sensors, Solar Power, Renewable Energy, Energy Harvesting, News

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Detecting Contaminants in Water

Many organic contaminants in the air and in drinking water need to be detected at very low-level concentrations. Research published by the laboratory of Prashant V. Kamat, the John A. Zahm Professor of Science at the University of Notre Dame, could be beneficial in detecting those contaminants.

Posted in: Environmental Monitoring, Metals, Sensors, Detectors, Semiconductors & ICs, News

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Rotary Sensing Technologies for Medical and Robotic Shaft Angle Sensing Applications

This technical brief provides an overview of existing types of rotary sensor technologies, and compares the strengths and weaknesses of each type for use as through-hole shaft angle sensing devices. Today’s sensor technologies for robotic and medical applications include many devices that have evolved from industrial applications. Because of this general migration, they are not ideally suited to the requirements in new robotic and medical products. Specifically, conventional contacting and non-contacting sensing solutions do not offer the customization, small package size(s), and environmental and durability requirements that are so necessary in these custom applications.

Posted in: Bio-Medical, Positioning Equipment, Sensors, Medical, Robotics, Briefs, MDB

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Sensor System Spurs Biofuel Production

University of California, Berkeley researchers have developed a genetic sensor that enables bacteria to adjust their gene expression in response to varying levels of key intermediates for making biodiesel. As a result, the microbes produced three times as much fuel. The sensor-regulator system could eventually make advanced biofuels cheaper.

Posted in: Sensors, Biomass, Renewable Energy, News

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