Sensors/Data Acquisition

Sensors Detect Disease Markers in Breath

Sensors were made from porous thin films of organic conductive plastics. (L. Brian Stauffer)

A small, thin square of organic plastic can detect disease markers in breath or toxins. The sensor chip can be used by patients and discarded.

Posted in: News, Detectors, Sensors
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One Plug-In Sensor Does Work of Many

The sensor board can be plugged in to a wall outlet, eliminating the need for batteries.

Researchers have developed a sensor package that monitors multiple phenomena in a room using machine-learning techniques. The prototype contained 19 different sensor channels, including sensors that indirectly detect sound, vibration, motion, color, light intensity, speed, and direction. The sensor board is plugged in to a wall outlet, eliminating the need for batteries.

Posted in: News, Sensors
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Wearable System Guides Visually Impaired Users

A new wearable system from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology will help blind users navigate through indoor environments.

Posted in: MDB, News, News, Imaging, Sensors
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Creating the Future: A Better Way to Map Terrain

Mark Skoog, an aerospace engineer at NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center, led the development of new software that stores terrain data in a more efficient and accurate way. The achievement, Skoog says, opens the prospect of anyone – yes, anyone – being able to fly.

Posted in: News, News, Aerospace, Imaging, Sensors
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Report from SPIE 2017: Drones Spot Gas Leaks from the Sky

ANAHEIM, CA. During last week’s SPIE Defense + Commercial Sensing 2017 conference, panelists from industry, academia, and government demonstrated how miniaturized sensing platforms, and the unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) hosting them, can improve the detection of hazardous gas leakage.

Posted in: News, News, Aerospace, Aviation, Detectors, Sensors
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Non-Toxic Material Generates Electricity Through Heat, Cold Air

Imagine a body sensor powered by one's jewelry, or a cooking pan that charges a cell phone in a few hours.

Using a combination of the chemical elements calcium, cobalt, and terbium, University of Utah researchers created an efficient, inexpensive and bio-friendly material that generates electricity through a thermoelectric process involving heat and cold air.

Posted in: News, Materials, Sensors
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Silk Sensor Finds Composite Flaws

Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a way to embed a nanoscale damage-sensing probe into a lightweight composite made of epoxy and silk.

Posted in: News, Detectors, Sensors
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Supersonic Spray Yields New Nanomaterial for Bendable, Wearable Electronics

Left, photograph of a large-scale silver nanowire-coated flexible film. Right, silver nanowire particles viewed under the microscope. (Credit: S.K. Yoon, Korea University)

A new, ultrathin film that is both transparent and highly conductive to electric current has been produced by a cheap and simple method devised by an international team of nanomaterials researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago and Korea University. The film is also bendable and stretchable, offering potential applications in roll-up touchscreen displays, wearable electronics, flexible solar cells and electronic skin.

Posted in: News, Electronics, Electronics & Computers, Materials, Sensors, Transducers
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World's 'Smallest Magnifying Glass' Supports New Sensors

Using tiny particles of gold, researchers from the University of Cambridge have concentrated light to smaller than a single atom. By focusing the light to just under a millionth of a meter, the scientists have a "magnifying glass" that reveals individual chemical bonds within molecules.

Posted in: News, Data Acquisition, Detectors, Sensors
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Ultrasensitive Sensors Keep Driverless Cars Safer

Sensor chips are implemented in CMOS technology. (© Photo Fraunhofer IMS)

News of the first serious accident involving an automated electric vehicle made headlines recently. Researchers are counting on light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology, in combination with other components, to fulfill the requirements for independent steering, braking, and acceleration.

Posted in: News, Sensors, Test & Measurement
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