Sensors/Data Acquisition

Tiny Wireless Sensing Device Alerts Users to Telltale Vapors Remotely

A research team at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) has developed a small electronic sensing device that can alert users wirelessly to the presence of chemical vapors in the atmosphere. The technology, which could be manufactured using familiar aerosol-jet printing techniques, is aimed at a variety of applications in military, commercial, environmental, healthcare and other areas.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Electronic Components, Board-Level Electronics, Electronics, Sensors, Detectors, Communications, Wireless, RF & Microwave Electronics, Semiconductors & ICs, Nanotechnology, News

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Hypersensitive Graphene Sensor Could Detect Single Gas Molecule

University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have discovered a way to create a highly sensitive chemical sensor based on the crystalline flaws in graphene sheets. The imperfections have unique electronic properties that the researchers were able to exploit to increase sensitivity to absorbed gas molecules by 300 times.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Electronics, Materials, Sensors, News

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NASA and Partners Use Sensing Technology to Target Megacities Carbon Emissions

The Megacities Carbon Project is an international, multi-agency pilot initiative to develop and test ways to monitor greenhouse gas emissions in megacities: metropolitan areas of at least 10 million people. Cities and their power plants are the largest sources of human-produced greenhouse gas emissions and are the largest human contributors to climate change.

Posted in: Environmental Monitoring, Green Design & Manufacturing, Greenhouse Gases, Sensors, Test & Measurement, Monitoring, Aerospace, RF & Microwave Electronics, News

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Wireless Sensing Lets Users “Train” Smartphones for Gesture Control

University of Washington researchers have developed a new form of low-power wireless sensing technology that could soon let users “train” their smartphones to recognize and respond to specific hand gestures near the phone. The “SideSwipe” technology uses the phone’s wireless transmissions to sense nearby gestures, so it works when a device is out of sight in a pocket or bag and could easily be built into future smartphones and tablets.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, PCs/Portable Computers, Sensors, Detectors, Communications, Wireless, RF & Microwave Electronics, Antennas, News

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Nanosensor/Cellphone Hybrid for Detecting Chemicals and Concentrations

Based on solid-state technology, the sensor requires no reagents and can be refreshed with an ultraviolet diode. Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California Nanosensors have been developed for chemical detection using carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Unlike other chemical sensors, this solid-state approach requires no reagents and can be refreshed with a solid-state ultraviolet (UV) diode. The sensors possess high sensitivity (ppbv), fast response (≈2 s), high selectivity, low power (μW), and very small size (1 cm2 or less based on advanced miniaturization), and they are ideally suited for integration with wireless networks or cellphone type devices.

Posted in: Physical Sciences, Sensors, Briefs

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Coated or Doped Carbon Nanotube Network Sensors as Affected by Environmental Parameters

Applications include medical diagnostics, gas leak detection, and homeland security and defense. Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California Chemical sensors have been developed over the past decades to detect gases and vapors at various concentration levels for deployment in a wide range of industrial applications. The detection usually centers on a change of a particular property or status of the sensing material, such as temperature, electrical, and optical characteristics. Other types of sensors include electrochemical cells, conducting polymer sensors, surface acoustic wave sensors, and catalytic bead sensors. Sensors based on nanotechnology promise to provide improved performance on all of these sensors compared to current micro and macro sensors.

Posted in: Physical Sciences, Sensors, Briefs

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Regenerable Internal CO Scrubber for Hydrogen Sensors

A guard electrode would protect the sensing electrode to maintain sensor sensitivity toward hydrogen. Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas Amperometric electrochemical sensors are commonly used for the detection of carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2) in air. The electrochemistry of heterogeneous CO and H2 oxidations is similar enough that the sensors show significant cross-sensitivities between the two gases. Thus, in applications where H2 is being monitored in the presence of CO, amperometric hydrogen sensors will produce false positive responses due to the presence of CO. This error is further aggravated by the fact that the sensor’s response to CO is typically at least twice that for hydrogen on a volumetric basis. Furthermore, chronic CO exposure will poison or fatigue the H2 sensor electrodes and reduce the sensor sensitivity toward hydrogen.

Posted in: Physical Sciences, Sensors, Briefs

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