Sensors/Data Acquisition

Temperature Sensors

Exergen Corp. (Watertown, MA) has announced the Extreme IRt/c non-contact temperature sensor. A custom-designed housing protects the sensor from extreme vibrations, shifts in pressure, and other acute ambient changes. The sensor was originally developed for a defense contractor whose client needed to measure the temperature of equipment mounted on the exterior of military aircraft.

Posted in: Products, Sensors

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Submersible Position Sensors

Macro Sensors (Pennsauken, NJ) has introduced submersible LVDT Position Sensors for use as part of subsea measurement systems. The SSIR 937 Series Submersible LVDT Position Sensors withstand deep sea environments with external pressures to 5000 psi. Designed for use in either pressure-balanced, oil-filled containers or directly in seawater, the 0.94-inch (24-mm)-diameter technologies are available in standard ranges of 2.00 inches (50 mm), 3.00 inches (75 mm), or 4.00 inches (100 mm). To minimize the number of pressure-sealed connections and I/Os, a 4-20mA two-wire, loop-powered I/O is utilized. The 4-20mA I/O also reduces noise over long transmission lines. A data acquisition system on the platform above supports offset management. For Free Info Visit http://info.hotims.com/61058-149

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Capacitive Force Sensor

Pressure Profile Systems (Los Angeles, CA) has released the SingleTact, a miniature capacitive force sensor. The ultra-thin, single-element device quantifies forces in analog or digital configuration. The SingleTact interface board can be customized for an engineer’s specific application. A choice of six sensor configurations is provided, including 8-mm and 15-mm diameter sensors, and force ranges from 100 grams to 45 kg full scale. For Free Info Visit http://info.hotims.com/61058-141

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Graphene Supports NASA-Developed Nanosensors

NASA Technologist Mahmooda Sultana has been leading the development of tiny graphene sensors. Because of the material’s extreme sensitivity, graphene-based sensors have a wide range of possible space applications, including the detection of strain in composite materials and the discovery of trace gases in planetary bodies.

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Energy Harvesting and the IoT: A New Bull Market

Combining industrial-grade rechargeable lithium batteries with energy harvesting technology delivers reliable power for remote wireless sensors connected to the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). The romantic notion of grizzled ranchers out riding the range on horseback to shepherd their herd of cattle may soon be a distant memory, as cloud-based sensor technology now permits real-time animal tracking from the comfort of home or office, or by smartphone.

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Researchers Prepare RoboSimian for Tasks Beyond Disaster Response

RoboSimian, a limbed robot developed at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), is designed to operate in environments too dangerous or difficult for human intervention, such as disaster areas and oil leak sites. After years of engineering in the lab, JPL’s researchers are preparing the tele-operated RoboSimian platform for use in new, complex environments, from deep waters to outer space.

Posted in: Application Briefs, Sensors

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Advanced Spacecraft Navigation and Timing Using Celestial Gamma-Ray Sources

This technology can decrease the overall operations cost of exploration missions by increasing the onboard navigation and guidance capabilities. Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland The Advanced Spacecraft Navigation and Timing using Celestial Gamma-Ray Sources concept is a novel relative navigation technology for deep-space exploration using measurements of celestial gamma-ray sources. This new Gamma-ray source Localization-Induced Navigation and Timing (GLINT) method incorporates existing designs of autonomous navigation technologies and merges these with the developing science of high-energy sensor components. This new enabling technology for interplanetary self-navigation could provide important mission enhancements to planned operational and discovery missions. It has the potential to decrease the overall operations cost of exploration missions by increasing the onboard navigation and guidance capabilities, and reducing the risk of uncertainty by providing these vehicles the freedom to explore those areas that are most interesting.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP, Sensors

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