Test & Measurement

NASA Model Provides 3-D View of L.A. Earthquake

On March 28, residents of Greater Los Angeles experienced the largest earthquake to strike the region since 2008. The magnitude 5.1 quake was centered near La Habra in northwestern Orange County about 21 miles (33 kilometers) east-southeast of Los Angeles, and was widely felt throughout Southern California. There have been hundreds of aftershocks, including one of magnitude 4.1.Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., have developed a model of the earthquake, based on the distribution of aftershocks and other seismic information from the U.S. Geological Survey.A new image based on the model shows what the earthquake may look like through the eyes of an interferometric synthetic aperture radar, such as NASA's Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR). JPL scientists plan to acquire UAVSAR data from the region of the March 28 quake, possibly as soon as this week, and process the data to validate and improve the results of their model. The UAVSAR flights serve as a baseline for pre-earthquake activity. As earthquakes occur during the course of this project, the team is measuring the deformation at the time of the earthquakes to determine the distribution of slip on the faults, and then monitoring longer-term motions after the earthquakes to learn more about fault zone properties. SourceAlso: Learn about QuakeSim 2.0.

Posted in: News, Mathematical/Scientific Software, Monitoring

Read More >>

Mini Science Lab Detects Multiple Bio Agents

It can cost hundreds of dollars and days to scan biological materials for important biomarkers that signal diseases such as diabetes or cancer using industry standard equipment. Researchers face enormous time constraints and financial hurdles from having to run these analyses on a regular basis. A Northeastern University professor has developed a single instrument that can do multiple scans at a fraction of the time and cost. That's because it uses considerably less material and ultra-sensitive detection methods to do the same thing. ScanDrop is a portable instrument no bigger than a shoebox that has the capacity to detect a variety of biological specimen. For that reason it will benefit a wide range of users beyond the medical community, including environmental monitoring and basic scientific research. The instrument acts as a miniature science lab, of sorts. It contains a tiny chip, made of polymer or glass, connected to equally tiny tubes. An extremely small-volume liquid sample — whether it's water or a biological fluid such as serum — flows in one of those tubes, through the lab-on-a-chip device, and out the other side. While inside, the sample is exposed to a slug of microscopic beads functionalized to react with the lab test's search parameters. The beads fluoresce when the specific marker or cell in question has been detected; from there, an analysis by ScanDrop can provide the concentration levels of that marker or cell. Because the volumes being tested with ScanDrop are so small, the testing time dwindles to just minutes. This means you could get near-real time measures of a changing sample — be it bacteria levels in a flowing body of water or dynamic insulin levels in the bloodstream of a person with diabetes. Source

Posted in: News, Environmental Monitoring, Diagnostics, Fluid Handling, Detectors, Sensors, Measuring Instruments

Read More >>

Ultrasonic Intake Airflow Meter for Testbeds

The airflow meter measures extremely dynamic phenomena of combustion engines without being affected by ambient influences or sensor contamination. An ultrasonic intake airflow meter for engine testbed applications was developed. An automotive intake airflow meter must fulfill a series of requirements differentiating it from typical ultrasonic flow meters. First, the data sampling rate of the device must be as high as possible to be able to measure dynamic phenomena of the combustion engine. It is therefore necessary to use broadband ultrasonic transducers capable of sending short signals without post-pulse oscillations. The state-of-the-art piezoelectric transducers cannot fulfill these requirements. For this reason, the FLOWSONIX

Posted in: Briefs

Read More >>

Improving Fidelity of Noise Repetitive Signals with Signal Averaging Technology

For many high-speed data acquisition applications requiring extraction of small repetitive signals from noisy environments, such as LIDAR or optical fiber testing, minimizing the effects of noise is a challenge for system design. Signal averaging provides dependable and efficient results. The article illustrates how FPGA-based signal averaging technology processes signals and reduces noise effects, improving signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) without occupying valuable CPU bandwidth.

Posted in: White Papers

Read More >>

Enabling Microliquid Chromatography by Microbead Packing of Microchannels

The microbead packing is the critical element required in the success of onchip microfabrication of critical microfluidic components for in-situ analysis and detection of chiral amino acids. In order for microliquid chromatography to occur, there must be a stationary phase medium within the microchannel that interacts with the analytes present within flowing fluid. The stationary phase media are the microbeads packed by the process discussed in this work. The purpose of the microliquid chromatography is to provide a lightweight, low-volume, and lowpower element to separate amino acids and their chiral partners efficiently to understand better the origin of life.

Posted in: Imaging & Diagnostics, Materials / Adhesives / Coatings, Monitoring & Testing, Optics/Photonics, Bio-Medical, Briefs, TSP, Briefs, TSP, Diagnostics, Fluid Handling, Measuring Instruments

Read More >>

Cogging Torque Analysis of a Permanent Magnet Machine in a Wind Turbine

Finite element analysis is used to analyze the effects of different designs on the reduction of cogging torque. Permanent magnet machines are used in many industrial applications because of their ability to produce high power densities. The market for such machines has been expanding due to the availability of affordable magnet materials, technological improvements, and advances in design and control. While still a relatively new phenomenon in wind turbines, permanent magnet generators are increasingly the focus of R&D in that field.

Posted in: Test & Measurement, Briefs

Read More >>

Fast, High-Precision Readout Circuit for Detector Arrays

The GEO-CAPE mission described in NASA’s Earth Science and Applications Decadal Survey requires high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution measurements to monitor and characterize the rapidly changing chemistry of the troposphere over North and South Americas. High-frame-rate focal plane arrays (FPAs) with many pixels are needed to enable such measurements.

Posted in: Test & Measurement, Briefs, TSP

Read More >>

White Papers

Refractory Metal Fasteners for Extreme Conditions: The Basics
Sponsored by Goodfellow
Piezo Motors Power MRI Robot
Sponsored by micromo
The Self-Driving Car
Sponsored by HP
Solar Electric Systems – Power Reliability
Sponsored by SunWize
Measurement of Harmonics using Spectrum Analyzers
Sponsored by Rohde and Schwarz A and D
Manager’s Guide to Productivity Gains With Multiphysics Simulation
Sponsored by COMSOL

White Papers Sponsored By: