Test & Measurement

How to Maximize Temperature Measurement Accuracy

Thermocouples are the most versatile and widely used devices for temperature measurements. Most test engineers are aware of the measurement errors caused by thermocouples but not always about the errors caused by the measurement system itself. This technical note will focus on the lesser known and important aspect called "Self-Calibration" and how it can be used to overcome errors in temperature measurement.

Posted in: Test & Measurement, White Papers

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International Space Station Test Analyzes Rotation of Objects in Space

Objects in space tend to spin in a way that's totally different from the way they spin on Earth. Understanding how objects are spinning, where their centers of mass are, and how their mass is distributed is crucial to any space mission. MIT researchers developed a new algorithm for gauging the rotation of objects in zero gravity using only visual information. They tested the algorithm aboard the International Space Station.

Posted in: Cameras, Imaging, Software, Simulation Software, Test & Measurement, Aerospace, RF & Microwave Electronics, News

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Motion Analysis Detects Joint Degeneration

If joints do no longer work as usual, humans tend to compensate this by unconsciously adapting their motions. In the case of knee arthrosis, or excessive joint wear, they shift the weight to the healthy leg. This relieves the worn knee joint, but also delays the pain that would indicate the start of arthrosis. Based on a computer-supported gait analysis, researchers are developing an early warning system for routine prevention.

Posted in: Electronics & Computers, Cameras, Imaging, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Test & Measurement, Measuring Instruments, Monitoring, News

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3D Printer Heads to International Space Station

The first 3D printer is soon to fly into Earth orbit, finding a home aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The size of a small microwave, the unit is called Portal. The hardware serves as a testbed for evaluating how well 3D printing and the microgravity of space combine. The soon-to-fly 3D printer can churn out plastic objects within a span of 15 minutes to an hour.The technology works by extruding heated plastic, and then builds successive layers to make a three-dimensional object. In essence, the test on the ISS might well lead to establishing a “machine shop” in space. The 3D printer experiment is being done under the tech directorate's Game Changing Development Program, a NASA thrust that seeks to identify and rapidly mature innovative/high impact capabilities and technologies for infusion in a broad array of future NASA missions.According to the team, manufacturing assets in space, as opposed to launching them from Earth, will accelerate and broaden space development while providing unprecedented access for people on Earth to use in-space capabilities. SourceAlso: Learn about Ammonia Leak Detection on the ISS.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Rapid Prototyping & Tooling, Materials, Plastics, Test & Measurement, Aerospace, News

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Building a Test System for High-Speed Data Streaming Applications

High-speed data streaming applications typically require maximum accuracy and long sampling times, including such applications as spectral monitoring, signal intelligence, LIDAR testing, optical fiber testing, radar and satellite signal acquisition, and software defined radio systems. These present unique engineering challenges requiring high throughput, and identifying design flaws and problems can contribute to reduced development costs and time to market, avoiding field recalls and costly system redesigns. The white paper discusses techniques for optimizing configuration of systems supporting high-bandwidth applications, by: Enabling high-speed real-time data streaming Designing applications optimizing system streaming performance Furnishing benchmarks that can be achieved in stream-to-disk and stream-to-memory applications

Posted in: Test & Measurement, White Papers

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Universal Mechanical Testers for Tribology Testing in the Automotive Industry

Universal mechanical testers provide tribology testing for friction, wear, coatings, and lubrication in macro, micro, and nano regimes. Bruker Nano Surfaces, Tucson, Arizona Very few industries are as affected by strict test standards as the automotive sector. Nearly every automobile component (engine parts, accelerators, clutches, brakes, tires, seatbelts, etc.) must exhibit adequate tribological properties in accordance with ASTM, DIN, JIS, ISO, and other comprehensive international standards. Universal mechanical testers (UMTs) that are able to perform multiple tests in a single platform with interchangeable modules can help manufacturers meet test specifications quickly and economically. For example, crankshafts and camshafts have critical requirements for proper functioning under diverse service conditions. Tests include evaluation of base materials, heat-treated parts, surface coatings, and lubricants. Tests can be run with diverse loads, velocities, and temperatures that simulate actual service conditions using various lubricants and liquids.

Posted in: Mechanical Components, Test & Measurement, Briefs

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Photogrammetric Recession Measurement

This method can be used to measure the recession of ablative materials in insulation coatings, ceramics and composites, arc-jet systems, and soil erosion. Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California The testing of materials that ablate as a design function requires detailed time history of the ablation process. The rate at which the surface recedes during testing is a critically important measure of the performance of thermal protection system (TPS) materials like heat shields for aerospace vehicles. Photogrammetric recession measurement (PRM) meets these needs by recording the surface of the ablating model during heating in hyperthermal test facilities (arc-jets), using two high-resolution digital cameras capable of recording simultaneously. The cameras are calibrated to yield three-dimensional object space measurement for each stereo pair of images, producing surface recession data over the portion of the model for which both cameras share a view.

Posted in: Physical Sciences, Test & Measurement, Briefs

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