News

Laser Drivers

The D200 is the latest in Highland Technology's (San Francisco, CA) line of high-performance compact precision laser drivers. A DC-coupled trigger signal produces fast, 2 nanosecond transitions. Up to 4 amps of regulated drive current supports lasers with forward voltages up to 9 volts. The built-in edge-triggered pulse generator provides up to 1us pulse widths. A pulse-follower mode is also provided, accommodating externally-defined trigger widths up to 100% duty continuous-wave (CW). Power, pulse width, drive current, and differential triggering functions are accessible through a ribbon cable header for embedded OEM applications. 

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Fiber Inspection Tool

Fiber Optic Center, Inc., (FOC) (New Bedford, MA) has announced the addition of the FiberChek Probe from Viavi to focenter.com.  Meeting all fiber inspection needs with built-in image viewing, auto-focus, pass/fail analysis, storage and recall, the FiberChek probe completely automates inspection workflows to ensure fast and accurate performance. The integrated touch-screen display shows live images and analysis results with easy navigation and testing for desired acceptance criteria, including IEC-61300-3-35 standards or customer-specific requirements.

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NASA's New AI: A 'Guardian Angel' for Firefighters

New research, developed in part by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, could someday be used to provide first responders and firefighters with real-time temperature, gas, and danger alerts.

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New Microscopy Method ‘Swells’ Cellular Structures

Cellular biologists work at a frustratingly small scale. Like their colleagues in particle physics, these scientists investigate fundamental questions about our lives and our world — but at a scale beyond the skill of our primate eyes. Microscopes have helped bring this invisible world into focus — and over the past several centuries since their invention, advances in microscopy have helped scientists visualize many details of life on the cellular level. But these approaches have costs — expensive equipment and complex specimen treatments — that ultimately restrict their widespread use.

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Fundamental Optics Experiments Seek to Create Better Long-Range Sensors

A pair of University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) researchers aim to explore fundamental properties of infrasonic optical sensors that could make them more sensitive and accurate over long distances. The results of their research, which combines experiments and theoretical modeling, could impact future operation of these sensors in areas ranging from national security to Earth system science.

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Light-Trapping 3-D Solar Cells Undergo Space Testing

A novel three-dimensional solar cell design developed at Georgia Tech will soon get its first testing in space aboard the International Space Station. An experimental module containing 18 test cells was launched to the ISS in July and will be installed on the exterior of the station to study the cells’ performance and their ability to withstand the rigors of space.

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Molecular Electronics Could Someday Replace Silicon Chips

Technion researchers have developed a method for growing carbon nanotubes that could lead to the day when molecular electronics replace the ubiquitous silicon chip as the building block of electronics.

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Research May Lead to More Durable Electronic Devices

Deep inside the electronic devices that proliferate in our world, from cell phones to solar cells, layer upon layer of almost unimaginably small transistors and delicate circuitry shuttle all-important electrons back and forth. It is now possible to cram 6 million or more transistors into a single layer of these chips. Designers include layers of glassy materials between the electronics to insulate and protect these delicate components against the continual push and pull of heating and cooling that often causes them to fail.

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Engineered “Sand” May Help Cool Electronic Devices

Baratunde Cola would like to put sand into your computer. Not beach sand, but silicon dioxide nanoparticles coated with a high dielectric constant polymer to inexpensively provide improved cooling for increasingly power-hungry electronic devices.

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Navy Grant Fuels Effort to Improve Safety of Military Technology

An Indiana University expert in the high-tech field of computer vision will collaborate with U.S. Navy engineers to improve the quality of microelectronic components used in critical military systems like communication and navigation. David Crandall, a professor in the IU School of Informatics and Computing, has received $450,000 from the Naval Engineering Education Consortium to conduct research in collaboration with the Crane, Ind.-based Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane Division on new methods to guarantee the integrity of the electronic circuitry used in U.S. Navy platforms.

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