News

Operators Control Multiple Drones by Thought

A researcher at Arizona State University has discovered how to control multiple robotic drones using the human brain. A controller wears a skull cap outfitted with 128 electrodes wired to a computer. The device records electrical brain activity. If the controller moves a hand or thinks of something, certain areas light up.

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Wave-Propelled Robot Swims, Crawls, Climbs

The first single actuator wave-like robot (SAW) has been developed by engineers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. The 3D-printed robot can move forward or backward in a wave-like motion, moving much like a worm would in a perpendicular wave.

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CARBON FOAM MADE FROM BREAD

Sturdy, lightweight carbon foam has many structural and insulating applications in aerospace engineering, energy storage, and temperature maintenance. Researchers have developed a strong, lightweight, environmentally friendly and low-cost method to produce carbon foam by using super-toasted bread.

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New Radar Measures Flow Fields for More Intelligent Wind Farms

Texas Tech University scientists have brought the wind power industry one step closer to its potential with the creation of a system to measure wind flow and control turbine-to-turbine interaction for maximum power generation.

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Gas Sensor Monitors Pollution from Power Plants and Roads 

A research team from Adelphi University in New developed a new device that can detect ultra-low concentrations of gases like nitrogen dioxide accurately and nearly instantaneously. The device works even when experiencing small vibrations, which is important if the instrument is deployed in the field.

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Wristband Sensor Predicts and Prevents Asthma Attacks

Researchers have developed an integrated, wearable system that monitors a user’s environment, heart rate, and other physical attributes with the goal of predicting and preventing asthma attacks. The system, called the Health and Environmental Tracker (HET), is composed of a suite of new sensor devices incorporated into a wristband and a patch that adheres to the chest.

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Scientists Simulate Bacteria-Powered 'Windfarm'

A team of scientists from Oxford University has shown how the natural movement of bacteria could be harnessed to assemble and power microscopic "windfarms."

Posted in: News, Energy Harvesting, Renewable Energy
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Researchers Develop Self-Healing, Shape-Changing Smart Material

Washington State University researchers have created a multi-functional smart material that changes shape when subjected to heat or light; the material then assembles and disassembles itself.

Posted in: News, Materials
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Coding and Computers Could Help Detect Explosives

A modern twist on an old technology could soon help detect rogue methane leaks, hidden explosives and much more. A Duke University team is using software to dramatically improve the performance of chemical-sniffing mass spectrometers.

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Engineers Use Cyborg Insects as Biorobotic Sensing Machines

A team of engineers from Washington University in St. Louis is looking to capitalize on the sense of smell in locusts to create new biorobotic sensing systems that could be used in homeland security applications.

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