Electronics

Researchers Create Smallest Transistor Ever

For more than a decade, engineers have been eyeing the finish line in the race to shrink the size of components in integrated circuits. They knew that the laws of physics had set a 5-nanometer threshold on the size of transistor gates among conventional semiconductors, about one-quarter the size of high-end 20-nanometer-gate transistors now on the market. But some laws are made to be broken, or at least challenged.

Posted in: News, Computers, Electronic Components, Electronics, Electronics & Computers
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T-rays Will “Speed Up” Computer Memory By a Factor of 1,000

Together with their colleagues from Germany and the Netherlands, scientists at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) have found a way to significantly improve computer performance. They propose the use of so-called T-waves – or terahertz radiation – as a means of resetting computer memory cells. This process is several thousand times faster than magnetic-field-induced switching.

Posted in: News, News, Board-Level Electronics, Computers, Electronic Components, Electronics, Electronics & Computers
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Design Contest Winner Could Save Trucking Industry Billions in Fuel Costs

Contest Draws over 1,100 Innovative Product Ideas from a Record 71 Countries

New York, NY – Hyliion of Pittsburg, PA, developer of a hybrid electric technology for semi-trailers, has been awarded a grand prize of $20,000 in the 2016 "Create the Future" Design Contest. Hyliion’s system hybridizes the trailer portion of the tractor-trailer combination and uses regenerative braking to capture power – saving over 30% on fuel and decreasing emissions by 10%.

Posted in: News, Automotive, Electronics
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2016 Create the Future Design Contest

The 2016 Create the Future Design Contest — sponsored by COMSOL, Mouser Electronics, and Tech Briefs Media Group (publishers of NASA Tech Briefs) — recognized innovation in product design in seven categories: Aerospace & Defense, Automotive/Transportation, Consumer Products, Electronics, Machinery/Automation/ Robotics, Med ical, and Sustainable Technologies. In this special section, you’ll meet the Grand Prize Winner, as well as the winners and Honorable Mentions in all seven categories, chosen from over 1,100 new product ideas submitted from a record 71 countries. To view all of the entries online, visit www.createthefuturecontest.com.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, Automotive, Defense, Electronics, Alternative Fuels, Energy, Renewable Energy, Green Design & Manufacturing, Medical, Patient Monitoring, Automation, Robotics, Design processes, Collaboration and partnering
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2016 Create the Future Design Contest: Electronics Category Winner

1,000X BETTER DATA COMPRESSION AND REAL-TIME DECODING OF HIGH-RESOLUTION MAPS

Shaun McWherter, Mark Skoog, and Jamie Willhite, NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA; and Loyd Hook, University of Tulsa, OK

This NASA-developed data-compression technology is capable of encoding massive amounts of data into a package more than 1,000 times smaller than with standard compression, which can transform the use of digital terrain maps (DTMs) in restricted environments such as tablets, smartphones, and embedded systems. Created at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center, the software system integrates innovative encoding and decoding algorithms to provide a 5,000:1 compression ratio and rapid/continuous decompression in constrained computing situations. It enables users to access and create customized DTMs from a variety of data sources using a single graphical user interface.

Posted in: Articles, Electronics, Cartography, Computer software / hardware, Computer software and hardware, Imaging, Imaging and visualization, Cartography, Computer software / hardware, Computer software and hardware, Imaging, Imaging and visualization, Data management
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Researchers Create Smallest Transistor Ever

A research team led by faculty scientist Ali Javey at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has created a transistor with a working 1-nanometer gate — the smallest to date.

Posted in: News, Board-Level Electronics, Electronic Components, Electronics, Electronics & Computers, PCs/Portable Computers
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The Economics of Accuracy in Low-cost, High-volume Sensing Applications

Various research firms forecast the market for portable medical devices to be somewhere around the $20 billion-range within the next several years. Part of the increased demand is due to an aging population with more chronic conditions. These smaller portable units requires devices with smaller footprints. By the same token, smaller devices need to provide adequate levels of care to ensure patient safety and comfort. Thus, functionality cannot be sacrificed for space.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, Electronics, Electronics & Computers, Semiconductors & ICs, Data Acquisition, Sensors
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Developing and Testing Electronic Control Units for Electric Drives

Air framers are looking to build more eco-friendly and economical aircraft, and they are turning to electric drives. One growing trend is to build more electrical aircraft by replacing pneumatic and hydraulic systems with electric actuators. Electric drives, therefore, will play an important role in the aircraft of the future. This paper examines the current state of technology for developing and testing electric drives.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, Aeronautics, Electronics, Electronics & Computers, Test & Measurement
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A High-Efficiency Power Module

Innovators at NASA’s Glenn Research Center have developed a microwave power module to power radar, communications, and/or navigation interchangeably. This high-efficiency, all-solid-state microwave power module (MPM) is based on a multi-stage distributed-amplifier design, which is capable of very wideband operation. This MPM is extremely durable and can last a decade or longer. Already more compact and lightweight than conventional designs, Glenn’s patented technique offers further size reduction by eliminating the need for either a traveling-wave tube amplifier or its accompanying kV-class electronic power conditioner. The performance of this MPM is exceptional, with much higher cut-off frequency and maximum frequency of oscillation than metal-semiconductor field-effect transistors offer, and the distributed amplifier’s wide bandwidth also results in much faster pulse rise times. Finally, Glenn’s design allows the module to operate in both pulsed and continuous wave modes, so it can single-handedly drive exceptional performance for radar, navigation, and communications.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics, Electronics & Computers, Amplifiers, Navigation and guidance systems, Radar, Telecommunications systems, Amplifiers, Navigation and guidance systems, Radar, Telecommunications systems, Semiconductors
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AGM Thumbtack™ Valves for Small Enclosures: Smaller and Drier

Sensitive equipment such as optics and electronics can be damaged by humidity and condensation. Placing moisture-sensitive equipment inside a sealed enclosure reduces the risk of damage, but temperature and pressure variations can be problematic for a sealed enclosure if it does not have a pressure-relief mechanism.

Posted in: White Papers, Defense, Electronics, Electronics & Computers, Instrumentation
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