Energy

Solid-State Lithium Sulfur Battery

Applications include electric vehicles, consumer electronics, UAVs, and wind and solar energy storage.

Sulfur is a promising cathode for lithium batteries due to its high theoretical specific capacity (1673 mAh/g), low cost, and environmental friendliness. With a high specific energy density of 2500 Wh/kg, which is a five times greater energy density than a conventional Li-ion battery, Li-S batteries hold great potential for next-generation high-energy storage systems. However, wide-scale commercial use has been limited because some key challenges, such as the dissolution of the intermediate discharge product (Li2Sx, 2<X<8) in conventional liquid electrolytes, remain unsolved. On the other hand, all-solid-state batteries (SSBs) are considered to be the ultimate power supply for pure electric vehicles (EVs). SSB systems demonstrate a new approach for novel Li-S batteries. Replacing the organic electrolyte with solid-state electrolytes (SSEs) will intrinsically eliminate the dissolution of polysulfide. However, all of the solidstate Li-S batteries incorporating current state-of-the-art SSEs suffer from high interfacial impedance due to their low surface area.

Posted in: Briefs, Energy, Battery cell chemistry, Lithium-ion batteries, Battery cell chemistry, Lithium-ion batteries, Electrolytes, Electric vehicles
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Standardized Heating Method to Trigger and Prevent Thermal Runaway Propagation in Lithium-Ion Batteries

Lithium-ion (Li-ion) cells are increasingly used in high-voltage and high-capacity modules. The Li-ion chemistry has the highest energy density of all rechargeable battery chemistries, but associated with that energy is the issue of catastrophic thermal runaway with a fire. With recent incidents in the commercial aerospace and electronics sectors, methods are required to prevent cell-to-cell thermal runaway propagation. The goal of this work was to achieve a common method for triggering a single cell in a Li-ion battery module into thermal runaway, determine if one can consistently obtain this thermal runaway event, and design mitigation measures to address propagation of the thermal runaway to other cells in the module.

Posted in: Briefs, Energy, Battery cell chemistry, Lithium-ion batteries, Battery cell chemistry, Lithium-ion batteries, Fire prevention, Risk assessments
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Researchers Advance Printable Solar Cell Possibilities

By finding a new way to manufacture low-cost perovskite solar cells, a team at the University of Toronto believes that making solar cells could someday be as easy and inexpensive as printing a newspaper. The researchers' alternative solar technology supports the development of low-cost, printable solar panels capable of turning nearly any surface into a power generator.

Posted in: News, Solar Power
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Will "$100-per-killowatt-hours" batteries boost wind and solar energy efforts?

This week’s Question: The Department of Energy (DOE) has set a goal of building a battery that stores energy for less than $100 per kilowatt-hour, making stored wind and solar energy competitive with energy produced from traditional power plants. Today’s lead INSIDER story featured a new flow battery that offers the potential to significantly decrease the costs of production. "If you can get anywhere near this cost target then you change the world," said researcher Michael Aziz. "It becomes cost effective to put batteries in so many places. This research puts us one step closer to reaching that target." What do you think? Will "$100-per-killowatt-hours" batteries boost wind and solar energy efforts?

Posted in: Question of the Week, Energy, Energy Storage
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Long-Lasting Flow Battery Advances Renewable Energy Efforts

A new flow battery from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) stores energy in organic molecules dissolved in neutral pH water. Losing only one percent of its capacity per 1000 cycles, the non-toxic, non-corrosive device offers the potential to significantly decrease the costs of production.

Posted in: News, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Energy Storage, Renewable Energy, Wind Power
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Electricity Generator Mimics Trees

Iowa State University scientists have built a device that mimics the branches and leaves of a cottonwood tree and generates electricity when its artificial leaves sway in the wind. The device is derived from biomimetics, or the use of artificial means to mimic natural processes. Such biomimetic technology could become a market for those who want to generate limited amounts of wind energy without the need for tall and obstructive towers or turbines.

Posted in: News, Energy Efficiency, Wind Power
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Energy Management System Cuts Hybrid Fuel Consumption by One-Third

Engineers at the University of California, Riverside have taken inspiration from biological evolution and the energy savings garnered by birds flying in formation to improve the efficiency of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) by more than 30 percent.

Posted in: News, Energy Efficiency
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Riding the Energy Sector Rollercoaster

Managing any business directly or indirectly affiliated with the oil and gas sector today is a challenge. You can compare the last five years in the energy industry to riding a speeding rollercoaster. One second the industry is climbing, and the next, it is plummeting. So perhaps you should ask yourself, “Is my company ready for the ride?”. This paper will help you answer that question and more.

Posted in: White Papers, Energy, Manufacturing & Prototyping
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New Fabrication Technique Creates More Efficient Plastic Solar Cells

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new strategy for fabricating more efficient plastic solar cells. The work has implications for developing solar cells with a wider absorption range and increased efficiency.

Posted in: News, Solar Power, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Manufacturing processes
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System Harvests Energy from Automotive Shock Absorbers

Boosting the fuel efficiency of motor vehicles by “harvesting” the energy generated by their shock absorbers and feeding it back into batteries or electrical systems such as air conditioning has become a major goal in automotive engineering. A University of Huddersfield (UK) researcher has designed a new system and built a prototype that is ready for real-world testing.

Posted in: News, Energy Harvesting, Motion Control
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