Health, Medicine, & Biotechnology

Laser printing with nanoparticles holds promise for medical research

Electronic devices that not only can be implanted in the human body but also completely dissolve on their own – known as bioresorbable electronics – are envisioned by many as one of medical technology's next frontiers. A new study by Missouri University of Science and Technology researchers suggests that a laser printing technique using nanoparticles could help unlock a more cost-effective approach to building sturdier and safer components.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
Read More >>

Process invented to make sustainable rubber and plastics

Synthetic rubber and plastics used for manufacturing tires, toys, and myriad other products are produced from butadiene, a molecule traditionally made from petroleum or natural gas. But those humanmade materials could get a lot greener soon, thanks to the ingenuity of a team of scientists from three U.S. research universities.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
Read More >>

Ultraviolet light sensor for wearable devices in the IoT era

Mass production technology for silicon-based ultraviolet (UV) light sensors, suitable for smartphones and wearable devices in the Internet of Things (IoT) era, has been jointly developed by a research team at Tohoku University and SII Semiconductor Corp., a semiconductor manufacturer at Seiko Instruments Group.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
Read More >>

Tech Briefs Q&A: Bringing Bioprinting to Life

A team from Northwestern University created bioprosthetic ovaries that ultimately led to the restoration of hormone production and fertility in mice.

Posted in: News, News, Implants & Prosthetics
Read More >>

NSK MOTORIZED BALL SCREW ACTUATOR (MBSA SERIES): NSK Achieves Space Saving Design with Linear Precision for Medical Applications

NSK Americas examines how advancements in technology have reduced equipment size used for medical applications. Contributing to this trend, NSK has developed the MBSA Series (motorized ball screw actuator). The new design eliminates the need for a separate motor-to-ball screw coupling. The compact space-saving design reduces system inertia and eliminates alignment error that can occur when the motor and ball screw are separately mounted. Not only is the new design compact, but it’s also precise. NSK uses a precision ground ball screw versus the traditional lead screw option. This white paper details why a precision ground ball screw is the optimal solution.

Posted in: White Papers, Bio-Medical, Medical
Read More >>

Advancing Bioabsorbable Scaffolds with Polymer Technology

In this White Paper, you will find information on:

Bioabsorbable scaffolds and the next revolution in endovascular therapy Advances in polymer technology to treat coronary artery disease Challenges to creating bioresorbable stents
Posted in: White Papers, Materials, Medical
Read More >>

Dual-modality imaging could guide cancer surgery

Researchers in The Netherlands have demonstrated that combining SPECT/CT and fluorescence imaging could help surgeons differentiate tumor tissue from normal tissue. Their study focused on colorectal cancer (CRC) that metastasized beyond the primary tumor. CRC is the second most common cancer in men and the third most common in women. According to the American Cancer Society, more than 50,000 people in the U.S. are expected to die from the disease in 2017.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
Read More >>

Brain imaging links Alzheimer's decline to tau protein

A buildup of plaque and dysfunctional proteins in the brain are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. While much Alzheimer's research has focused on accumulation of the protein amyloid beta, researchers have begun to pay closer attention to another protein, tau, long associated with this disease but not studied as thoroughly, in part, because scientists only recently have developed effective ways to image tau.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
Read More >>

Paving the way for practical super-resolution imaging

The concept of a perfect lens that can produce immaculate and flawless images has been the Holy Grail of lens makers for centuries. In 1873, German physicist and optical scientist Ernst Abbe discovered the diffraction limit of the microscope. In other words, he discovered that conventional lenses are fundamentally incapable of capturing all the details of any given image. Since then, there have been numerous advances in the field to produce images that appear to have higher resolution than allowed by diffraction-limited optics.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
Read More >>

Optical imaging technology catches DNA ‘blinking’

Many of the secrets of cancer and other diseases can be found in the cell's nucleus. But getting to that level – to see and investigate the important genetic material housed there – requires creative thinking and extremely powerful imaging techniques.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
Read More >>

The U.S. Government does not endorse any commercial product, process, or activity identified on this web site.