Imaging

Head-Worn Display Concepts for Ground Operations for Commercial Aircraft

This display enables a higher level of safety during ground operations, including taxiway navigation and situational awareness.

Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia

The Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck (IIFD) project, part of NASA’s Aviation Safety Program (AvSP), comprises a multi-disciplinary research effort to develop flight deck technologies that mitigate operator-, automation-, and environment-induced hazards. Toward this objective, the IIFD project is developing crew/vehicle interface technologies that reduce the propensity for pilot error, minimize the risks associated with pilot error, and proactively overcome aircraft safety barriers that would otherwise constrain the next full realization of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). Part of this research effort involves the use of synthetic and enhanced vision systems and advanced display media as enabling crew-vehicle interface technologies to meet these safety challenges.

Posted in: Articles, Briefs, TSP, Aeronautics, Aerospace, Aviation, Displays/Monitors/HMIs, Imaging, Displays, Displays, Ground support, Commercial aircraft
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Flight Imagery Recorder Locator (FIRLo) and High-Temperature Radome

This technology is applicable to the commercial airline industry for locating “black boxes.”

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California

LDSD (Low Density Supersonic Decelerator) is a Mars EDL (entry, descent, and landing) Technology Development Project that launches three test vehicles out of the Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai. On the test vehicle, most mission science data can be recorded safely on land; however, high-speed and high-resolution imagery cannot be telemetered due to bandwidth constraints. Therefore, all information had to be recorded solely onboard the test vehicle; this unit is called the flight imagery recorder (FIR). A typical commercial airliner “black box” is only capable of recording on the order of gigabytes of data, whereas this work required on the order of terabytes (a few orders of magnitude larger).

Posted in: Articles, Briefs, Communications, Imaging, Imaging, Imaging and visualization, Imaging, Imaging and visualization, Event data recorders, Spacecraft
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Product of the Month: LED Light Engines for Large FOV Fluorescence Imaging Systems

Innovations in Optics, Inc. (Woburn, MA) offers high power LED Light Engines as excitation illuminators for large field-of-view fluorescent imagers used in life science instruments. LumiBright LE Light Engines feature patented non-imaging optics that direct LED light into a desired cone angle, while producing highly uniform output, both angularly and spatially. The two standard far-field half-angles are 20 and 40 degrees. Available peak LED wavelengths range from 365 nm in the ultraviolet through 970 nm in the near-infrared.

Posted in: Products, Products, Imaging, LEDs, Photonics
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CCD Image Sensor

The KAI-08051 charge-coupled device (CCD) image sensor from ON Semiconductor (Phoenix, AZ) shares the same advanced 5.5 micron pixel architecture, 8 megapixel resolution, 15 frame per second readout rate, and 4/3 optical format as the existing KAI-08050 Image Sensor, but improves key performance parameters through the use of an improved amplifier design, newly optimized microlens structure, and new color filter pigments in both Bayer and Sparse color configurations.

Posted in: Products, Products, Imaging, Photonics, Sensors
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Thermal Imaging Core

FLIR Systems, Inc. (Portland, OR) has announced its latest thermal imaging core, Muon™, which is designed specifically for OEMs capable of integrating uncooled FPAs into their own camera solutions. Muon is based on FLIR’s 17μ pitch Vandium Oxide (VOx) 640x512 or 336x256 FPAs and offers frame rates of 9Hz and up to 60Hz. Optimized for size, weight and power (SWaP), Muon has a form factor of 22 mm × 22 mm × 6 mm, a mass of less than 5 grams, and depending on the configuration, uses less than 300mW of power.

Posted in: Products, Products, Imaging, Photonics
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Imaging Sensor Targets

Headwall (Fitchburg, MA) has announced the availability of a new hyperspectral imager targeting very high resolution spectral measurements of 0.1 nm over specific spectral ranges that yield indicators of vegetative fluorescence to measure plant health. The new sensor is based on Headwall's all-reflective concentric optical design that uses very precise, very high diffraction-efficiency gratings for simultaneous high spatial and spectral resolution of < 0.1nm across the spectral range of the instrument.

Posted in: Products, Products, Imaging, Photonics, Sensors
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sCMOS Camera

The Andor (Belfast, UK) Neo 5.5 megapixel sCMOS camera is a unique - 40°C vacuum cooled platform designed around a low noise 5.5 megapixel sensor with 6.5 μm pixels and a 22mm diameter to drive lowest possible dark noise. Ideal for cell microscopy, astronomy, digital pathology, and high content screening, the Neo 5.5 delivers 30 fps sustained or up to 100 fps burst mode to its internal 4GB memory. The Rolling and Global shutter feature further enhances application flexibility, Global shutter in particular offering an ideal means to simply and efficiently synchronize the Neo with other 'moving' devices such as stages or light switching sources and eliminating the possibility of spatial distortion when imaging fast moving objects.

Posted in: Products, Products, Cameras, Photonics
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High-Speed Cameras

XIMEA (Munster, Germany) recently announced new Thunderbolt™ technology ready cameras that are equipped with the newest sensors from Sony (IMX174) and CMOSIS (CMV20000). The cameras provide highest speeds and direct access to computer memory at 10 and 20 Gbit/s respectively.

Posted in: Products, Products, Cameras, Photonics
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NASA Advances Next-Generation 3D-Imaging Lidar

Building, fixing, and refueling space-based assets or rendezvousing with a comet or asteroid will require a robotic vehicle and a super-precise, high-resolution 3D imaging lidar that will generate real-time images needed to guide the vehicle to a target traveling at thousands of miles per hour. A team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center is developing a next-generation 3D scanning lidar — dubbed the Goddard Reconfiguable Solid-state Scanning Lidar (GRSSLi) — that could provide the imagery needed to execute these orbital dances.

GRSSLi is a small, low-cost, low-weight platform capable of centimeter-level resolution over a range of distances, from meters to kilometers. Equipped with a low-power, eye-safe laser; a MEMS scanner; and a single photodetector, GRSSLi will "paint" a scene with the scanning laser, and its detector will sense the reflected light to create a high-resolution 3D image at kilometer distances.

A non-scanning version of GRSSLi would be ideal for close approaches to asteroids. It would employ a flash lidar, which doesn’t paint a scene with a mechanical scanner, but rather illuminates the target with a single pulse of laser light — much like a camera flash.

Source:

Posted in: News, Aerospace, Electronics & Computers, Imaging, MEMs, Lasers & Laser Systems, Photonics, Automation, Robotics
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Moving Cameras “Talk” to Identify and Track Pedestrians

University of Washington electrical engineers have developed a way to automatically track people across moving and still cameras by using an algorithm that trains the networked cameras to learn one another’s differences. The cameras first identify a person in a video frame then follow that same person across multiple camera views.

With the new technology, a car with a mounted camera could take video of a scene, then identify and track humans and overlay them into the virtual 3D map on a GPS screen. The researchers are developing this to work in real time, which could help track a specific person who is dodging the police.

The team also installed the tracking system on cameras placed inside a robot and a flying drone, allowing the robot and drone to follow a person, even when the instruments came across obstacles that blocked the person from view.

Source:

Posted in: News, Cameras, Imaging, Video, Visualization Software, Automation, Robotics
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