Photonics/Optics

Portable Spectrometer

Saelig Company, Inc. (Fairport, NY) has introduced the GL SPECTIS 5.0 Touch - a portable instrument for obtaining light measurement data ranging from NIR to UV with laboratory accuracy. Unique features of the GL SPECTIS 5.0 Touch include: laboratory accuracy, extended spectral range from 200 to 1050nm, very high resolution (0.5nm), an OSR system for stray light reduction, and compatibility with a wide range of available integrating spheres and probes for measuring almost any light source from 1 - 200,000lux (Illuminant A).

Posted in: Products, Products, Photonics
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Photothermal Excitation For Atomic Force Microscopy

Asylum Research (Santa Barbara, CA), an Oxford Instruments company, has announced blueDrive photothermal excitation, an option available exclusively for Asylum’s Cypher™ Atomic Force Microscopes (AFMs). blueDrive makes tapping mode imaging simple, stable, and accurate. blueDrive replaces the conventional piezoacoustic excitation mechanism, instead using a blue laser to directly excite the AFM cantilever photothermally. This results in an ideal cantilever drive response in both air and liquids, which provides significant performance and ease of use benefits for tapping mode imaging.

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DOP Meter

Using a patented maximum & minimum search technique, the DOP- 201 from General Photonics (Chino, CA) measures and displays the Degree of Polarization (DOP) of a light source in real time with high accuracy and wide dynamic range. While polarimeter-based systems are expensive and can be inaccurate for low-DOP sources, and polarization scrambler- based instruments are less accurate for high DOP sources, the DOP-201 accurately measures both low and high DOP. It is ideal for characterizing the performances of depolarizers and depolarized light sources, such as ASE and SLED sources and the pumps for Raman amplifiers.

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120mW Laser Diode

Oclaro’s (Denville, NJ) HL63142DG high power red laser diode offers an inbuilt monitor photodiode at a lasing wavelength of 637nm. It is a unique design which enables system designers to control optical power output by monitoring the photodiode current and adjusting power variants and temperature for precise control and constant performance.

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Dual Inverted Selective Plane Illumination Microscope

A new dual inverted selective plane illumination microscope from Applied Scientific Instrumentation (Eugene, OR) generates 3d volumes with isotropic resolution (330) nm in all directions, offers axial resolution that is approximately 2x better than confocal or spinning disk systems, features acquisition rates up to 200 images per second or 2-5 volumes per second (roughly 10 times faster than spinning disk microscopes), achieves an approximately 7-10 fold reduction in photobleaching, and uses conventional mounting and glass cover slips. This microscope has multicolor capability and has been tested successfully on cells cultured on cover slips, cells embedded in collagen gels, and nematode and zebrafish embryos.

Posted in: Briefs, Photonics, Microscopy, Microscopy, Test equipment and instrumentation
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Infrared Imaging Camera Engines

Sofradir EC, Inc. (Fairfield, NJ) is introducing a new line of high performance infrared imaging engines. The Miniature Thermal Imaging Engines, labeled “MiTIE”, utilize a Sofradir cryogenically cooled MCT infrared detector. Three models will be introduced, the MiTIE MWIR-HD, a high definition 1280x1024 mid-wave imager and two VGA-format 640x512 engines, one for the long-wave spectral band (MiTIE LWIR) and the other for the mid-wave band (MiTIE MWIR). The MiTIE camera engines each include an integrated detector/dewar cooler assembly based on a 15 micron pitch, high performance Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) IR focal plane array. The engines produce both analog NTSC/PAL video as well as 14-bit digital data (Camera Link and HDMI). The camera control interface is either USB or Camera Link.

Posted in: Briefs, Photonics, Imaging, Imaging and visualization, Imaging, Imaging and visualization
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Microspectrometer

The STS-UV Microspectrometer from Ocean Optics (Dunedin, FL) is a compact, high-performance spectrometer. Measuring just 40mm x 42mm and 24mm high, this product is optimized for applications in the ultraviolet (190-650 nm) including absorbance measurements, point of care diagnostics, emission spectroscopy and laser characterization. The STS-UV is anchored by a 1024- element detector in a crossed Czerny Turner optical bench. Its optical design and advanced CMOS detector elevate STS to performance levels comparable to larger and more expensive spectrometers. Previously released versions of the STS are also available for the visible (350-800 nm) and shortwave near-IR (650-1100 nm) regions of the spectrum.

Posted in: Briefs, Photonics, Optics, Optics, Diagnostics, Test equipment and instrumentation
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Thermal Night Vision Systems

Senso Optics (Yokneam, Israel) has announced development of the world’s first "Thermal camera on Chip(TM)" for ADAS (Advance Driver Assistance System). ADAS is a driver warning system, designed to reduce accidents and lane departures by altering the driver. The ADAS also includes advanced features such as active braking and steering assistance. The new ASIC thermal system includes a SWaP-P (smaller, less Weight, power and Price) thermal miniature camera module with higher sensitivity. Senso Optics offers The ADAS to be able to support day, night, and adverse weather operating conditions. The system can even cope with extreme conditions such as heavy fog, smoke and smog. The system emphasizes live figures as human, animals and crossing pedestrians.

Posted in: Briefs, Photonics, Driver Assistance systems, Driver Assistance systems, Visibility
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Plastic Optic Fiber—An Evolving Technology

POF technology has much to offer to the device industry.

Plastic Optic Fiber (POF) is an established, continually evolving technology available since the early 1980s. From the outset, it was a technology not highly visible for years. At times, it was utilized as a media product within another product, attached to a variety of opto-couplers or light sources. Primarily it was intended to transmit information of functional digital data transfer for many sensing concepts and for small form illumination. In addition, the very nature of POF technology brings to engineering many of the attributes of glass fiber optic technology. But, the extensive functions of POF lend themselves to much wider product uses including medical instruments, data control and networks, automotive use, and a host of industrial concepts. At the same time, POF offers low-cost solutions for short-range communications, and a majority of defined illumination requirements.

Posted in: Briefs, MDB, Briefs, Lighting, Custom & Contract Manufacturing, Materials, Plastics, Inspection Equipment, Medical, Fiber Optics, Optical Components, Optics, Photonics, Robotics, Data acquisition and handling, Fiber optics, Data acquisition and handling, Fiber optics, Medical equipment and supplies, Plastics
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Slowing Light Via Beam Coupling in Dye-Doped Chiral Nematics

Apart from the fundamental interest of discovering the physical effects that are behind the light-matter interaction processes that make it possible, slowing and storing light currently attracts a lot of attention because the ability to control the propagation speed of optical pulses, to stop and to release them on demand, is a key tool in the manipulation of optical signals. Two main applications directly benefit from the ability to slow and store light: the first is the buffering/multiplexing of optical pulses, concerning telecommunications and optical delay lines, and the second is phase sensing, as employed for detecting small phase variations, realizing compact, highly-sensitive interferometers or implementing phase compensation in optical array systems.

With respect to other exiting methods to obtain slow light, the novelty of the method proposed here is the use of a photochemical process of dye molecules hosted in a chiral liquid crystal structure and the associated photo-isomerization induced transparency effect1. The idea of using a molecular medium is, in itself, new, but also the type of molecular assembly, the chiral structure, is important. Indeed, the helical structure is sufficiently rigid to keep the dyes in their places, and to avoid optically induced orientation of the liquid crystals, while soft enough to allow local and small changes of the molecular order around the dyes with transformed shape (cis state). When a pulse is sent onto the medium together with a reference beam, the change of shape of the dyes in the illuminated regions produces a dynamic hologram that keeps the memory of the pulse and allows slowing it down via the induced variations of the medium dispersion properties.

Posted in: Briefs, Tech Briefs, Photonics, Optics, Optics, Chemicals
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