Tech Exchange

Low-Cost Liquid Metal Cooling for High-Thermal-Density Electronics

Liquid metal has been used as a coolant for system-level thermal management for decades in nuclear reactors. The reason is its efficiency — liquid metal can have an effective thermal conductivity 10 to 100 times the thermal conductivity of copper. However, cost and long-term reliability of liquid metal cooling approaches have previously precluded its widespread use for cooling of high-thermal-density electronics. Rockwell Collins has developed a liquid metal cooling technology that solves these issues.

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Microscopically Reinforced Polymers Without Fibers or Fillers

This micro-reinforcement technology enables new applications where existing thermoplastics, elastomers, thermosets, and reinforcing technologies have not had sufficient toughness or fracture strength, particularly at elevated temperatures. The new reinforcement technology does not compromise the base polymer’s inherent characteristics such as heat and chemical resistance. The technology can be used for elastomers as well as for polymers (both thermosetting and thermoplastic types). The resulting composite is available in sheet precursor form, which can then be converted into different molded shapes.

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Accurate Laser Micro-Etching

A one-step laser etching process proves advantageous for the microfabrication of optics, electromechanical systems, and fluidics. Utilizing a laser-absorbing fluid against the back side of virtually any solid, transparent material, any of a number of lasers can perform micro-etching of 1 millimicron to 10 millimicrons. Etching can employ two or more lasers on transparent plates, cylinders, rods, films, vessels, or blocks. The resulting etched design may resemble hatching, a grid array, a bubble array, or any special design.

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Microscale Atomic Clock Enables Applications in GPS, and Radio Channel Density

Most atomic clocks are bench-bound, and even portable units can weigh in excess of 10 pounds. This invention is a cesium laser atomic clock that can be constructed using photoresist MEMS (microelectromechanical system) technology. The glass cell measures about 1 cubic centimeter and it operates using only about tens of milliwatts of electricity. The technology can bring timing at atomic clock accuracy to applications such as GPS, frequency hopping for security, and communication channel density. By using a cesium cell, a laser diode, and a photo diode, the system requires no volume resonator to control the frequency of laser light. By using MEMS manufacturing techniques, this miniature atomic clock offers an order of magnitude decrease in size and power consumption, and stability and accuracy comparable to atomic clocks many times its size. Because of its size and power consumption, the clock opens up new opportunities in fields that require miniature, extremely accurate clocks. Get the complete report on this technology at: www.techbriefs.com/tow/200909b.html Email: nasatech@yet2.com Phone: 781-972-0600

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Tamper-Evident Packaging for Consumer Products

Tamper-evidence properties are often achieved by adding secondary packaging such as foil seals or heat-shrink seals that inflate the cost of the container. This invention provides a proven technology to produce an injection-molded, tamperevident plastic lid for a container that can be used in the absence of a foil lid, and yet provides an effective hermetic seal. Even after its initial opening, the lid reseals air- and water-tight. It is available in 1,000-ml and 500-ml sizes, but can be molded to requirements. This product is ideal for yogurt, ice cream, sauce, and even non-food items such as washing powder, paint, and products where protection against moisture is required after opening. Most containers that have a foil seal also have a secondary lid that fits loosely on the tub after the foil seal is removed. Such lids do not offer water– and air–tight sealing. Secondary seals such as foil seals add to the cost of the packaging and prevent the product from being screened by metal detectors to detect metal parts in the final product. Get the complete report on this technology at: www.techbriefs.com/tow/200909a.html Email: nasatech@yet2.com Phone: 781-972-0600

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Real-Time Dogfight Guiding System

Successful performance of BFM (Basic Flight Maneuvers) presents the greatest challenge facing combat pilots. Acquiring and maintaining the required skills for dogfights is a long, complicated and costly process. The solution is a system that provides automatic assessment of a situation and automatic recommendation guidance to the pilot. Re c - ommended guidance on the Helmet Mounted Sight/Head Up Display Solution allows different BFM methods and simulates activation of various missiles. The software performs accurate, real-time situation assessment and provides a dynamic guidance to the pilot. These guidance and recommendations will help to enhance the performance of the crew during the participation in a closein maneuvering air combat training. A data link provides real-time relevant data of the trainer aircraft. Aircraft and weapon system performance and limits are input to system software. The system provides constant assessment of the BFM, and a unique algorithm analyzes and provides the realtime solution. Get the complete report on this technology at: www.techbriefs.com/tow/200908b.html Email: nasatech@yet2.com Phone: 781-972-0600

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Fluorinated ZDDP Improves Mileage and Reduces Engine Wear

This technology takes ZDDP — Zinc Dialkyl Dithiophos - phate, an anti-wear oil additive — and enhances it by adding fluorine to the chemical backbone. The resulting new molecule improves engine fuel economy by 3%, reduces engine wear from that available with conventional ZDDP, and contains from 100 to 250 ppm of phosphorus to prolong the life of catalytic converters. It contains about a third of the phosphorus in conventional ZDDP, and the phosphate compounds it does produce bind to the fluorine and become embedded in the tribofilm deposited on the contact surfaces. The additive is a liquid, and presents no suspension issues. In grease and in similar lubrication applications, the new molecule is effective at both low-load/high-speed applications and at high-load applications. Fluorinated ZDDP has application in all internal combustion engines; in gasoline, diesel, and natural gas generators; in transmissions and differentials; and in grease and lubrication applications (such as wheel bearings, CV joints, journal boxes, and automated machinery). Get the complete report on this technology at: www.techbriefs.com/tow/200908a.html Email: nasatech@yet2.com Phone: 781-972-0600

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