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Noncircular Cross Sections Could Enhance Mixing in Sprays

Preliminary results suggest that elliptical cross sections may be best. A computational study has shown that by injecting drops in jets of gas having square, elliptical, triangular, or other noncircular injection cross sections, it should be possible to increase (relative to comparable situations having circular cross section) the entrainment and dispersion of liquid drops. This finding has practical significance for a variety of applications in which it is desirable to increase dispersion of drops. For example, in chemical-process sprays, increased dispersion leads to increases in chemical-reaction rates; in diesel engines, increasing the dispersion of drops of sprayed fuel reduces the production of soot; and in household and paint sprays, increasing the dispersion of drops makes it possible to cover larger surfaces.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP

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Probe Without Moving Parts Measures Flow Angle

Flow angle is computed from forces measured by use of strain gauges. The measurement of local flow angle is critical in many fluid-dynamic applications, including the aerodynamic flight testing of new aircraft and flight systems. Flight researchers at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center have recently developed, flight-tested, and patented the force-based flow-angle probe (FLAP), a novel, force-based instrument for the measurement of local flow direction. Containing no moving parts, the FLAP may provide greater simplicity, improved accuracy, and increased measurement access, relative to conventional moving-vane-type flow-angle probes.

Posted in: Briefs

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Predicting and Preventing Incipient Flameout in Combustors

Increases in acoustic signals could trigger rapid adjustments to prevent flameouts. A method of predicting and preventing incipient flameout in a combustor has been proposed. The method should be applicable to a variety of liquid- and gas-fueled combustors in furnaces and turbine engines. Until now, there have been methods of detecting flameouts after they have occurred, but there has been no way of predicting incipient flameouts and, hence, no way of acting in time to prevent them. Prevention of flameout could not only prevent damage to equipment but, in the case of aircraft turbine engines, could also save lives.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP

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Detecting Conductive Liquid Leaking From Nonconductive Pipe

A capacitive detector is scanned over the ground above the pipe. A method that can be implemented with relatively simple electronic circuitry provides a capability for detecting leakage of an electrically conductive liquid from an electrically nonconductive underground pipe. Alternatively or in addition, the method can be applied to locate the pipe, whether or not there is a leak. Although the method is subject to limitations (some of which are described below), it is still attractive as an additional option for detecting leaks and locating pipes without need for extensive digging.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP

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Hot Films on Ceramic Substrates for Measuring Skin Friction

Low-thermal-conductivity ceramic substrates, based on Space Shuttle tile technology, serve to increase sensitivity. Hot-film sensors, consisting of a metallic film on an electrically nonconductive substrate, have been used to measure skin friction as far back as 1931. A hot film is maintained at an elevated temperature relative to the local flow by passing an electrical current through it. The power required to maintain the specified temperature depends on the rate at which heat is transferred to the flow. The heat-transfer rate correlates to the velocity gradient at the surface, and hence, with skin friction. The hot-film skin friction measurement method is most thoroughly developed for steady-state conditions, but additional issues arise under transient conditions.

Posted in: Briefs

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Nulling Infrared Radiometer for Measuring Temperature

A microwave-radiometer self-calibration principle would be adapted to measurement of infrared. A nulling, self-calibrating infrared radiometer is being developed for use in noncontact measurement of temperature in any of a variety of industrial and scientific applications. This instrument is expected to be especially well-suited to measurement of ambient or near-ambient temperature and, even more specifically, for measuring the surface temperature of a natural body of water. Although this radiometer would utilize the long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) portion of the spectrum (wavelengths of 8 to 12 µm), its basic principle of operation could also be applied to other spectral bands (corresponding to other temperature ranges) in which the atmosphere is transparent and in which design requirements for sensitivity and temperature-measurement accuracy could be satisfied.

Posted in: Briefs

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Wheel Design Verified With FEA Software

This paper examines an aluminum wheel design used with a run-flat tire called an extended mobility technology (EMT) tire, which can be safely driven without air for at least 80 km (50 miles). The setup of the finite element model of the wheel is discussed in detail, along with a parametric study of the inflation pressures and resulting stresses to verify that existing wheel designs could maintain the safety benefit of controlled handling and braking, even when the tire goes flat.

Posted in: Manufacturing & Prototyping, Briefs

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