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Would you like to ride in a Hyperloop?

This week's Question: A Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) team took top honors this month at a competition to design the Hyperloop, a high-speed transportation concept from Tesla Motors and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk. In the absence of air or surface friction, the Hyperloop design enables passenger pods to travel through airless tubes at more than 600 mph. Using low-energy propulsion systems, the Hyperloop theoretically utilizes air pressure to “hover” above a track. MIT's team will now have the opportunity to build and test its design in the US. The researchers will perform simulations, try out braking systems, and, with great caution, test dangerously strong magnets. What do you think? Would you like to ride in a Hyperloop? 

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Will "Antipodes" take off?

This week's Question: Canadian industrial designer Charles Bombardier has developed an aircraft concept that, in theory, could send passengers from London to New York in 11 minutes. The "Antipode" would have a scramjet engine and wings fitted with rocket boosters, propelling the aircraft to 40,000 feet and enabling the aircraft to reach Mach 5. To bring the concept to reality, engineers are challenged with addressing sonic booms as well as the materials' resistance to high heat. A proposed aerodynamic technique called long penetration mode (LPM), however, would use a nozzle on the aircraft's nose to blow out air and cool down the surface temperature, while also muffling the noise made from breaking the sound barrier. The design is decades away, according to the researchers. What do you think? Will "Antipodes" take off?

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Will a brain modem become a reality?

This week's Question: The U.S. military’s Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) unveiled plans last week to develop a "brain modem." The implantable neural interface allows wearers to transmit data from their brains to external digital devices. DARPA's goal is to achieve this communications link in a biocompatible device no larger than one cubic centimeter in size. Applications of the neural interface technology include boosting a soldier’s hearing or vision by providing additional digital auditory or visual information into the brain. What do you think? Will a brain modem become a reality? 

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Would you prefer to fly in a hybrid aircraft?

This week's Question: Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are developing a hybrid plane that will, like a hybrid car, rely on both fossil fuels and electricity to power itself through the sky. The NASA engineers are looking at power systems that generate electricity in place of, or in addition to, thrust at the turbine engine, and then convert that electricity into thrust using fans at other places on the aircraft. The Glenn team says the advances could make flying up to 30 percent more fuel efficient. What do you think? Would you prefer to fly in a hybrid aircraft? 

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Will virtual reality help astronauts?

This week's Question: Former astronaut and current Dartmouth University physician Jay Buckey and his team have sent Oculus Rift headsets to Canadian Force Station Alert, a military station in Canada located 500 miles from the North Pole. The researchers will ultimately test whether exposure to nature through virtual reality can help to improve mood and stress levels. Buckey hypothesizes that the VR tools may someday benefit astronauts on deep-space missions. What do you think? Will virtual reality help astronauts?   

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Will the growing number of drones cause too many headaches for aviation officials?

This week's Question: Hundreds of thousands of the unmanned aircraft are expected to be sold between Black Friday and the end of the year, providing both a boon for the emerging industry and a potential headache for aviation safety officials. Parrot's Bebop Drones, for example, were featured prominently in Target's Black Friday ads, and the drone maker generated $42 million in its third quarter this year, a 60% increase from the same period a year ago. Some aviation experts are concerned, however, that the new drone owners will take the skies without knowledge of airspace rules or best practices for staying safe. The FAA is currently racing to implement new rules that would require hobbyists to register their drones before taking to the skies.   What do you think? Will the growing number of drones cause too many headaches for aviation officials? 

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Will Li-Fi catch on?

This week's Question: A technology called ìLi-Fiî uses light waves from ordinary LED light bulbs to deliver internet connectivity that, according to its creators, is cheaper, more secure, and 100 times faster that broadband internet. Velmini ó a tech company in Tallinn, Estonia ó is the first to test visible light communication technology in a real-world scenario, using Li-Fi-equipped LED lights. According to the International Business Times, the technology transmits data at 1 gigabit per second (Gbps); Li-Fi lab simulations recorded speeds up to 224 Gbps. Li-Fi will not entirely replace Wi-Fi entirely since light waves, unlike radio waves, cannot travel through walls. In addition, the tool does not work outdoors with direct sunlight. The company's co-founder estimates that the technology will be ready for public use within the next two to three years. What do you think? Will Li-Fi catch on? 

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