Special Coverage

Home

Will 'Smell Notes' Catch On?

Set for a beta launch in July, a new "oPhone" app allows users to compose and send notes containing aromas. The free app lets user send the smell note by text or email, based on a set menu of scents contained in 'Ochips.' The message can be received like a typical text from a mobile device, and recipients can then download the composition from hotspots, which will be set up in the launch city of Boston. Creators of the technology see potential for the scent technology as a new type of self-expression, and possibly even a new language that may be used together with music, books, and other kinds of art.

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

Will Most Doctors Adopt Wearable Computing Like Google Glass?

Emergency room clinicians at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston recently tried out the wearable Google Glass eyeglasses. With Google Glass, the doctors could communicate and examine patients while simultaneously reading their charts. By using Glass to access information, doctors could remain with a patient and did not need a tablet to search through relevant medical documents and files.

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

Will You Use A Speed-Reading App?

Spritz, a Boston-based software developer, claims that users of its technology can read up to 1,000 words per minute (wpm) via its new technology. At that rate, readers could finish a 300-page novel (like Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, as the Huffington Post noted) in less than 90 minutes. The app, optimized for small screens and set to be released soon with the Samsung Galaxy S5 and Samsung Gear 2, presents just one word at a time, each aligned by an "Optimal Recognition Point." The technology keeps the eye focused on the fixation point typically found just left of center in a word.

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

Will Wearable Computing Improve Your Workouts?

A new technology called Moov wants to be your own personal trainer. A wearable fitness gadget, Moov analyzes an exerciser's form, offering real-time suggestions on how to improve workouts. The small, plastic disc attaches to a specfic body part that a wearer wants to analyze during a work: A runner can place the device in his or her shoe, for example, or a cardio-boxer can fit the technology on his or her wrist. By pairing with an app, the Moov tracks movement and body position to provide instant feedback and details about one's progress.

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

Will Retinal Displays Catch On?

The Glyph headset, from the Ann Arbor, MI-based Avegant, beams video into a user's eyes, without requiring a screen. To emulate the way the eye processes images, the technology uses a set of 2 million microscopic mirrors to reflect visuals, even 3D content, into the eye. The headset’s screen can be connected to personal computers, the Xbox, the PlayStation, and Android devices. To address style concerns, Glyph looks like a wearable headset. What do you think? Will retinal displays catch on?

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

Will Connected Eyewear Replace Traditional Glasses?

Google recently announced that it will add Google Glass options for prescription glasses. The search giant's wearable computer features an optical head-mounted display that presents information in a smartphone-like format. "We're going to reach some day, hopefully it will be soon, where people will wonder 'why would I want traditional glasses? They don't do X, Y or Z,' " said Google Glass Product Director Steve Lee.

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

Will "Anticipatory Shipping" Catch on?

Amazon recently obtained a patent for "anticipatory shipping" — a system of delivering products to customers before they place an order. Using predictive analytics, such as previous searches and customer wish lists, the company could potentially ship items to a hub in the customer’s area ahead of time. When users are ready to buy the item, it can then show up quickly, perhaps as soon as a few hours. There is a financial risk, however; if the company inaccurately predicts what a customer wants, then shipping costs are wasted.

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

White Papers

SunWize Power Systems – Guidelines for Choosing the Right Product
Sponsored by SunWize
Aqueous Critical Cleaning: A White Paper
Sponsored by Alconox
Changing Face of Robotics
Sponsored by Maplesoft
Determination of Capacitor Life as a Function of Operating Voltage and Temperature
Sponsored by Evans Capacitor
Oscilloscope Fundamentals Primer
Sponsored by Rohde and Schwarz
Domestic Versus Offshore PCB Manufacturing
Sponsored by Sunstone Circuits

White Papers Sponsored By: