Special Coverage

Self-Healing Wire Insulation
Thermomechanical Methodology for Stabilizing Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) Response
Space Optical Communications Using Laser Beams
High Field Superconducting Magnets
Active Response Gravity Offload and Method
Strat-X
Sonar Inspection Robot System
Home

Is robo-journalism valuable?

This week's Question: Lars Eidnes, a Norwegian developer, recently created software that uses Recurrent Neural Networks (RNN)—a form of “deep learning”—to write new "clickbait” headlines. After training the software with several million articles from BuzzFeed, Gawker, Jezebel, the Huffington Post, and Upworthy, Eidnes created an entire auto-generated news site called Click-o-Tron, which paired the headlines with photos and short articles, also assembled by the neural network. In early 2015, The Verge reported that the Associated Press has an automated system producing around 3,000 stories per quarter. The Los Angeles Times similarly uses its “Quakebot” algorithm to write short earthquake reports, and Google is finding headlines from newspapers like the Daily Mail to teach its neural networks to parse language. What do you think? Is robo-journalism valuable? 

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

Is "neuromarketing" valuable for consumers?

This week’s Question: Last week, Japanese retailer Uniqlo debuted UMood, a brain-wave analysis system designed to match the right T-shirt to a specific customer. After the shopper puts on an electroencephalography (EEG) headset, the technology's algorithm employs five metrics — interest, like, concentration, stress, and drowsiness — to measure the user's response to a set of videos, and tries to best find a design that corresponds with the user's mood. Uniqlo used surveys to map its more than 600 T-shirt styles and colors to various mood territories. What do you think? Is “neuromarketing” valuable for consumers?

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

Are video games good for the brain?

This week’s Question: A new study published from the Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences found action video games—which require players to navigate complex 3D settings, account for quick-moving targets, and switch between focused and distributed attention—are most beneficial to cognitive abilities. Another early 2015 study, however, published by the Douglas Mental Health University Institute, showed that while video game players exhibit more efficient visual attention abilities, they are also much more likely to use navigation strategies that rely on the brain's reward system (the caudate nucleus) and not the brain's spatial memory system (the hippocampus). What do you think? Are video games good for the brain? 

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

Will telemedicine improve health care delivery?

This week's Question: Telemedicine Services like American Well, a Boston, MA-based service, allow smartphone or Web users to have a video consultation with a physician. According to a July report by investment bank RBC Capital markets, telemedicine technology has the potential to save more than $40 billion annually by cutting nearly two-thirds of unnecessary emergency room visits, and save nearly $20 billion a year by replacing one-third of physician visits. The move toward telemedicine options, like apps and video conferencing, however reduce face-to-face care. What do you think? Will telemedicine improve health care delivery?  

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

Is AI good for management?

This week's Question: The Japanese electronics maker Hitachi Ltd. said it has developed a new artificial intelligence program that will enable robots to deliver instructions to employees based on analyses of big data and the workers’ routines. According to a Hitachi spokesperson, the AI program improved a warehouse work efficiency by 8%. Tests showed that artificial intelligence could accurately issue work orders for employees at the warehouse, instructing them on the most efficient route to pick up a product. The software, however, removes human intervention from the work processes. What do you think? Is AI good for management? 

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

Will virtual reality apps catch on?

This week's Question: After its acquisition of Oculus VR, the social network Facebook is working on a stand-alone video app that would support 360-degree, or "spherical" videos. CEO Mark Zuckerberg, who has called virtual reality the next "computing platform" after mobile devices, imagines that the Oculus headset will enable many new immersive experiences, from virtual doctors’ appointments to live events like basketball games and concerts. The mobile-video app would offer less of an immersive experience than the Oculus headset, but may introduce the technology to larger audiences. Google and Samsung Electronics Co. have also unveiled virtual-reality viewers this year. What do you think? Will virtual reality apps catch on?

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

Will an aquatic barrier clean up the ocean?

This week's Question: According to recent research from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, there are currently 5.25 trillion pieces of plastic in the world's oceans. The Ocean Cleanup, an organization seeking to rid waters of plastic waste, has plans to build a massive aquatic "barrier" in the ocean that would corral trash into a concentrated area for collection and disposal. The barrier, which will appear as a large "V" shape in the water, will "take advantage of the natural movement of ocean currents," drawing debris to the center of the structure. The team plans to build the wall in the water between Hawaii and California by 2020. What do you think? Will an aquatic barrier clean up the ocean?  

Posted in: Question of the Week

Read More >>

The U.S. Government does not endorse any commercial product, process, or activity identified on this web site.