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Advanced Ceramic Heaters Improve IC Packaging and System Performance

The continuous increase in the consumption of semiconductor devices and the emergence of new applications in optical components — MEMS, LCD display, flip-chip, chip-onglass, and multichip modules — has created a vast demand for faster throughput and better die-bonding equipment for IC packaging. IC packaging requires a typical ramp rate of 100ºC per second to 400 to 500ºC ±2°C, and a cycle time of 7 to 15 seconds. Similarly, IC chip testing, which stresses chips between -40 to 125ºC while monitoring electrical parameters, also requires a faster cycle rate. To manufacture ICs of all types, a die bonder or die attach equipment is used to attach the die to the die pad or die cavity of the package’s support structure. The two most common processes for attaching the die to the die pad or substrate are adhesive die attach and eutectic die attach. In adhesive die attach, adhesives such as epoxy, polyimide, and Ag-filled glass frit are used to attach the die. Eutectic die attach uses a eutectic alloy. Au-Si eutectic, one commonly used alloy, has a liquidous temperature of 370ºC, while another alloy, Au-Sn, has a liquidous temperature of 280ºC.

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Sensor Interface Design Demystified

With the rapid expansion of available sensor elements driven by the growth of MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) sensors, the considerations of sensor interface design become ever more important. The design engineer needs to understand both the sensor as well as the application in order to make the proper design tradeoffs in this already tricky art of analog front-end design. The challenge is further compounded with the trend toward MEMS technologies and their inherently smaller signals. This article attempts to cover some of the basics of sensor interface design and gives a cursory overview of the challenges and trade-offs of the possible approaches. It’s Not Just a Resistor Fundamentally, every sensor can be modeled as a simpler component, albeit a component with a value that changes over time. Usually this means we can treat them as either a simple passive impedance, such as a resistance, capacitance, or inductance, or as an active source, such as a current or voltage source. As these values change with time, we need to be able to convert that change into a time-varying voltage. Furthermore, we need to maintain the linearity of the sensor while we do this.

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Sponsors,“Create the Future” 2006 Design Contest

The Emhart Innovation Center: Tomorrow’s Fastening Design Technology Today In today’s competitive marketplace, manufacturers need suppliers who not only deliver the parts required to build a product, but those who deliver support and consultation on how best to use those parts. Emhart Teknologies is in the business of delivering that support. The company offers their customers access to a global network of what it calls “Innovation Centers.” These engineering facilities provide the latest in R&D for fastening design and automated fastening systems, delivering value analysis to a large cross-section of industrial manufacturers.

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Meet the Judges, “Create the Future” 2006 Design Contest

Emhart Teknologies and NASA Tech Briefs thank the following judges for their participation:

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Merit Prize Winners, “Create the Future” 2006 Design Contest

Winners of Black & Decker power tools

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Second Prize Winners, “Create the Future” 2006 Design Contest

Winners of DeWalt Power Tool Combination Kits

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First Prize Winner, “Create the Future” 2006 Design Contest

Grip Handle Buck AlbrittonWinner of a Panasonic 42" plasma TV Designed by: Buck Albritton GearMax Ashland, VA

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