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Supercomputer Cooling System Uses Refrigerant to Replace Water
Computer Chips Calculate and Store in an Integrated Unit
Electron-to-Photon Communication for Quantum Computing
Mechanoresponsive Healing Polymers
Variable Permeability Magnetometer Systems and Methods for Aerospace Applications
Evaluation Standard for Robotic Research
Small Robot Has Outstanding Vertical Agility
Smart Optical Material Characterization System and Method
Lightweight, Flexible Thermal Protection System for Fire Protection
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Simplified Machine Design Approach for Optimal Servomotor Control

An often asked question from industrial machine builders or integrators is how they can effectively design or implement the conversion of a machine with servo technology to meet performance expectations. This is a specialized task filled with layers of complexity that can prove difficult to execute, even when the scope of work is fully understood.

Posted in: Articles, Motion Control, Design processes, Sensors and actuators, Industrial vehicles and equipment

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NASA Proxy Maps Reveal Earthquake Damage

On April 25, 2015, a magnitude - 7 . 8 earthquake caused widespread building damage in central Nepal. The Italian Space Agency’s COSMO-SkyMed Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellite acquired data over Kathmandu – a 50 x 50 km area – four days after the earthquake. Using the SAR information, Sang-Ho Yun and other researchers of the Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology produced a damage proxy map showing areas of potential building damage.

Posted in: Articles, Sensors, Radar, Disaster and emergency management, Emergency management, Satellites

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Inertial Sensors Get in the Driver’s Seat

Tiny devices improve safety, comfort in ADASTwo decades have passed since automotive manufacturers began using the first microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) accelerometer to measure strong acceleration and trigger the deployment of airbags (see Figure 1). The inaugural inertial sensor paved the way for more widespread use of accelerometers in today’s advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS).

Posted in: Articles, Sensors, Driver Assistance systems, Microelectromechanical devices, Airbag systems

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Dual-Channel Transceiver

Red Rapids, Richardson, TX, introduced the Model 372 FPGA-configurable dual-channel transceiver that features a dual-channel 16-bit analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and dual-channel 16-bit digital-to-analog converter (DAC) clocked at 310 MHz. The converters are coupled to a Xilinx Kintex-7 FPGA that is also connected to high-throughput SRAM. The transceiver is available on a single XMC, CCXMC, or PCI Express half-length form factor board. The SRAM interfaces to the FPGA through separate 18-bit read and write ports to achieve a combined 8 Gbytes/sec data transfer rate.

Posted in: Articles, Products, Aerospace, Manufacturing & Prototyping

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Rittal’s Hannover Fair Contest Trip Closes with Facility Tours

After a full week in Germany, Rittal Corporation (www.rittal.us), the world’s largest enclosure manufacturer and a leader in thermal management of electrical, electronic, and IT equipment, brought its “Win a Trip to Hannover Fair with Rittal!” contest to a close with tours of three of its facilities.

Posted in: Articles, News, Manufacturing & Prototyping

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The Future of Exploration Starts With 3D Printing

Last year, engineers at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL, tested an additive manufacturing process that is being used to make some of the parts for NASA’s new rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS), more efficiently and affordably without compromising performance and safety. Selective laser melting (SLM) is a 3D printing process used to create complex parts for the engine and other components of the rocket. Four RS-25 engines and two solid rocket boosters will power the core stage of the SLS.

Posted in: Articles, Aerospace, Defense, Additive manufacturing, Launch vehicles

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Space Blanket-Inspired Cases Protect Expensive Devices

NASA-developed heat shield technology protects iPads and iPhones from both heat and frigid cold.In the 1960s, NASA was preparing for early forays into space, and worked to devise thin, reflective, metallic material to protect spacecraft from the dangers of solar radiation. This material — metallized polyethylene terephthalate (MPET) — is strong and not only reflects radiation, but also serves as powerful insulation to protect electronics from large swings in temperature.

Posted in: Articles, Spinoff, Aerospace, Electronic equipment, Thermodynamics, Materials properties, Metals, Polymers, Radiation protection

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