Special Coverage

Distributed Propulsion Concepts and Superparamagnetic Energy Harvesting Hummingbird Engine
Aerofoam
Wet Active Chevron Nozzle for Controllable Jet Noise Reduction
Magnetic Relief Valve
Locking Mechanism for a Flexible Composite Hinge
Active Aircraft Pylon Noise Control System
Unmanned Aerial Systems Traffic Management
Method of Bonding Dissimilar Materials
Sonar Inspection Robot System
Home

Die Attach Adhesives Impact Product Quality Well Beyond Manufacturing

Die attach adhesives serve a vital role in semi-conductor assembly, manufacturing and throughout the product life cycle. In this white paper, learn how they facilitate assembly and about the application process. Read why thin bond lines are so important for product life cycle. Bond strength is only one, albeit critical requirement for many applications; read about many other performance characteristics of epoxies and why they offer diverse solutions to meet critical application needs.

Posted in: White Papers, Electronics & Computers

Read More >>

Ultra Low Thermal Resistant Adhesives for Electronic Applications

As advances in epoxy and silicone materials constantly evolve, manufacturers of advanced electronic systems will find that adhesives offer the ability to meet nearly any combination of requirements for thermal, environmental, and structural stability. As product manufacturers face greater challenges in assembling die, package, and other components into products able to cope with increasing heat loads, adhesives are particularly versatile for bonding, sealing and coating. Moreover, the use of filler materials in adhesives can help to fine tune the specific performance demands required to extend product life cycles and meet manufacturing requirements. Learn more about why and how ultra low thermally conductive adhesives are the preferred fastening approach in applications requiring careful thermal management.

Posted in: White Papers, Electronics & Computers

Read More >>

Conductive Coatings Protect Circuitry from EM/RF and ESD

With the trend toward smaller and smaller electronic devices, unintentional EMI/RFI interference has become more of an issue. Shielding of these interferences is critical and coatings can be successfully applied as protection on the materials used. In this paper, the different sources of interference are explored, as well as how coatings can play a critical role in protecting these sensitive components and boards.

Posted in: White Papers, Electronics & Computers, RF & Microwave Electronics

Read More >>

Electric Field Quantitative Measurement System and Method

This technology could be used for medical imaging, security applications, weather prediction, and nondestructive evaluation of composites and insulators.NASA Langley Research Center’s Electric Field Imaging (EFI) system is the only noncontact method capable of quantitatively measuring the magnitude and direction of electrostatic fields in near- and far-field applications. Based on low-cost, commercially available components, the EFI system uses measurement of very-low-current, human-safe electric fields to construct a three-dimensional image of objects and people based on their dielectric properties. This platform technology, originally developed for measurement of the efficacy of electrical shielding around cables, could be optimized for a variety of applications, including medical imaging, security and detection, weather and natural disaster prediction, and nondestructive evaluation of composites and insulators. The EFI system has the potential to offer a lower-cost, portable, and safer alternative to the imaging systems currently used in these applications.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers

Read More >>

Auto-Balancing Series-Stacked Input DC-DC Converter

This invention could enable practical, reliable, and efficient power conversion in high-voltage DC systems without power level limitation.ADC-DC converter that can operate from a high input voltage is needed for future high-power space applications. However, the selection of space-qualified, high-voltage transistors and filter capacitors for such a converter are very limited. The available high-voltage components have lower performance than lower-voltage components. One possible solution to this problem is connecting in series the inputs of multiple converters to lower the input voltage at the individual converter inputs. However, because of component tolerances, performance degradation, and transient events, this can result in an unbalanced voltage distribution throughout the various inputs. Excessive voltage on any of the stacked converters can damage components and cause a catastrophic failure. A circuit that could inherently balance the voltage between the inputs of multiple low-voltage DCDC converters would have better performance and reliability.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers

Read More >>

Larger-Area Integrated Electrical Metallization Dielectric Structures with Stress-Managed Unit Cells for Extreme- Environment Semiconductor Electronics Chips

Electronic circuits that operate in high temperatures are used in automobiles, airplanes, oil drilling operations, and many other applications.The use of patterned multiple layers of thin films of metal and dielectric to form integrated circuit interconnections of transistors and/or form on-chip circuit capacitors is well known to those skilled in the art of semiconductor microelectronic fabrication. Because differing layers of thin film materials have different physical and thermal expansion properties, it is also well known that stress is inherently present in these multilayer film structures on a microelectronic chip. The amount of stress changes with temperature and as a function of lateral feature size/area across the chip. When stress anywhere within a patterned metal film feature becomes critically large (i.e., the “yield stress” is exceeded), the metal film can physically crack, buckle, or delaminate from other layers, which usually damages/fails the intended electrical operation of the microelectronic circuit.

Posted in: Briefs, Electronics & Computers

Read More >>

New Stamping Technique Enables Printable Electronics

The carbon nanotube stamp can print electronic inks onto rigid and flexible surfaces. (Sanha Kim and Dhanushkodi Mariappan) The next time you place your coffee order, imagine slapping onto your to-go cup a sticker that acts as an electronic decal, letting you know the precise temperature of your coffee. Engineers at MIT have invented a fast, precise printing process that may make such electronic surfaces an inexpensive reality. The stamp is made from forests of carbon nanotubes and can print electronic inks onto rigid and flexible surfaces. The stamping process should be able to print transistors small enough to control individual pixels in high-resolution displays and touchscreens. It could also offer a relatively cheap, fast way to manufacture electronic surfaces for as-yet-unknown applications.

Posted in: UpFront, Electronics

Read More >>

The U.S. Government does not endorse any commercial product, process, or activity identified on this web site.