Special Coverage

Transducer-Actuator Systems for On-Machine Measurements and Automatic Part Alignment
Wide-Area Surveillance Using HD LWIR Uncooled Sensors
Heavy Lift Wing in Ground (WIG) Cargo Flying Boat
Technique Provides Security for Multi-Robot Systems
Bringing New Vision to Laser Material Processing Systems
NASA Tests Lasers’ Ability to Transmit Data from Space
Converting from Hydraulic Cylinders to Electric Actuators
Automating Optimization and Design Tasks Across Disciplines
Vibration Tables Shake Up Aerospace and Car Testing
Supercomputer Cooling System Uses Refrigerant to Replace Water

Dr. Keiko Munechika, Manager, Nanofabrication, aBeam Technologies, Hayward, CA

Dr. Munechika — along with Alexander Kosh­elev and Giuseppe Calafiore at aBeam Technologies, and Stefano Cabrini at the Molecular Foundry at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory — is developing a process that would enable widespread adoption of nano-optic technology. The team perfected a technique for fabricating a Campanile probe, whose tapered, four-sided shape resembles the top of the Campanile clock tower on UC Berkeley’s campus. The probe focuses an intense beam of light onto a much smaller spot than is possible with current optics.

Posted in: Who's Who, Optical Components, Optics
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Introducing a Novel Spectral Analysis System for Measuring High-Performance Thin-Film Optical Filters

Alluxa offers and manufactures high-performance optical thin films that are used in wide ranging applications including life sciences, research, semiconductor and LIDAR. All of Alluxa's thin-film optical filters and mirrors are hard-coated using a proprietary plasma deposition process on equipment that was designed and built by our team. This allows us to repeatably produce the same high-performance optical thin films in all of our coating chambers.

Posted in: White Papers, Optics, Photonics
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Writing with Light: An ‘Etch A Sketch’ Electrical Circuit

Physicists from Washington State University (WSU) have used lasers to draw conductive circuits into a crystal. The achievement demonstrates a new kind of transparent, three-dimensional electronics: circuits that can be erased and reconfigured, like the drawings of an Etch A Sketch.

Posted in: News, Board-Level Electronics, Electronic Components, Electronics & Computers, Lasers & Laser Systems, Optical Components, Optics, Photonics
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Sound-Off: What’s Next for Optical Design Processes?

Mechanical engineers require a variety of tools to ensure the proper design of optical products like cell phones and autonomous vehicle sensor systems. In a presentation titled "Trends Driving Innovations in Optical Product Design," an attendee asked our expert: What will be integrated into the design process next?

Posted in: News, Optical Components, Optics
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Trends Driving Innovations in Optical Product Design

Companies developing cutting-edge optical products—from virtual reality to autonomous vehicles—can gain an enormous competitive advantage by getting their products to market ahead of their competitors.

Posted in: On-Demand Webinars, Optics
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New Products: July 2017 Photonics & Imaging Insider

Asphere Measurement System

The AspheroCheck UP from TRIOPTICS (Weden, Germany) is designed with a completely automated measurement process that requires no manual interaction to accurately measure aspheres. Lenses with aspherical surfaces are frequently used in small, light, high-performance optics to reduce spherical aberration. While the decentration of an aspherical surface can be determined with the centration measurement that is also used for spherical lenses, determining a possible tilt requires an additional, off-axial test.

Click here to learn more.

Posted in: Products, Fiber Optics, Lasers & Laser Systems, Optical Components, Optics, Photonics
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World’s Brightest Laser Sparks New Behavior in Light

Physicists from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln are seeing an everyday phenomenon in a new light. By focusing laser light to a brightness 1 billion times greater than the surface of the sun — the brightest light ever produced on Earth — the physicists have observed changes in a vision-enabling interaction between light and matter. Those changes yielded unique X-ray pulses with the potential to generate extremely high-resolution imagery useful for medical, engineering, scientific and security purposes.

Posted in: News, Imaging, Lasers & Laser Systems
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New Class of ‘Soft’ Semiconductors Could Transform HD Displays

A new type of semiconductor may be coming to a high-definition display near you. Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have shown that a class of semiconductor called halide perovskites can emit multiple, bright colors from a single nanowire at resolutions as small as 500 nanometers. The findings represent a clear challenge to quantum dot displays that rely upon traditional semiconductor nanocrystals to emit light. It could also influence the development of new applications in optoelectronics, photovoltaics, nanoscopic lasers, and ultrasensitive photodetectors, among others.

Posted in: News, Materials, Photonics, Semiconductors & ICs
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'Magic' Alloy Could Spur Next Generation of Solar Cells

In what could be a major step forward for a new generation of solar cells called "concentrator photovoltaics," University of Michigan researchers have developed a new semiconductor alloy that can capture the near-infrared light located on the leading edge of the visible light spectrum. Easier to manufacture and at least 25 percent less costly than previous formulations, it's believed to be the world's most cost-effective material that can capture near-infrared light—and is compatible with the gallium arsenide semiconductors often used in concentrator photovoltaics.

Posted in: News, Materials, Photonics, Semiconductors & ICs
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Blue-Light-Canceling Lens Gives Skiers a Clearer View

An optical filter for assessing plant health finds use in ski goggles.

Spinoff is NASA’s annual publication featuring successfully commercialized NASA technology. This commercialization has contributed to the development of products and services in the fields of health and medicine, consumer goods, transportation, public safety, computer technology, and environmental resources.

Posted in: Articles, Optical Components, Optics, Optics, Optics, Terrain, Human factors, Coatings Colorants and Finishes, Coatings, colorants, and finishes, Polymers, Visibility
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