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Silicones Meet the Needs of the Electronics Industry

Remarkable silicones. The combination of their unique ability to maintain physical properties across a wide range of temperature, humidity, and frequency--combined with their flexibility--set them apart. Silicone based adhesives, sealants, potting and encapsulation compounds are used in hundreds of consumer, business, medical, and military electronic systems. In this white paper, learn what makes silicones different from other organic polymers, why their properties remain stable across different temperatures, and how they have played a major role in the rapid innovation of the electronics industry.

Posted in: White Papers

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Sponge-Like Material Soaks Up Oil Spills

In hopes of limiting the disastrous environmental effects of massive oil spills, scientists from Drexel University and Deakin University, in Australia, have teamed up to manufacture and test a new material. The boron nitride nanosheet absorbs up to 33 times its weight in oils and organic solvents — a trait that supports the quick mitigation of costly accidents.

Posted in: News

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Single-Layer Material Mimics Photosynthesis

A Florida State University researcher has discovered an artificial material that mimics photosynthesis and potentially creates a sustainable energy source. The new material efficiently captures sunlight; then, the energy can be used to break down water into oxygen (O2) and hydrogen (H2).

Posted in: News

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HAIs and Chemical Resistance

Efforts to prevent healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) have put increasing pressure on today’s medical devices. It’s much more common than ever to see medical devices that can’t do the job—or fail prematurely—due to the effects of harsh disinfectants.

Posted in: White Papers, White Papers, Coatings & Adhesives

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Using Paraffin Phase Change Material to Make Optical Communication-Type Payloads Thermally Self-Sufficient for Operation in Orion Crew Module

Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland The Orion Crew Module has a pressurized cabin of approximately 20 m3 in volume. There are a number of cold plates within the Crew Module for thermal management. An optical communication type of payload consists of electronics boxes and modems that dissipate a significant amount of heat during science operation. Generally, such payloads operate for a short term (e.g., up to one hour). If these heat-dissipating components are flown inside the Crew Module, they require heat rejection to the cold plates in the Crew Module. The waste heat is transported from the cold plate to thermal radiators located outside the Orion spacecraft. This makes such a payload thermally dependent on the Crew Module cold plates.

Posted in: Briefs, TSP

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Aerogel-Filled Foam Core Insulation for Cryogenic Propellant Storage

Advanced cryogenic insulation has applications in energy, medicine, food storage and packaging, and electronics. Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama Current cryogenic insulation materials suffer from various drawbacks including high cost and weight, lack of structural or load-bearing capability, fabrication complexity, and property anisotropy. A need clearly exists for lightweight thermal insulation that is isotropic and structurally capable with high thermal performance, while also offering reduced fabrication and installation complexity, and lower cost.

Posted in: Briefs

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Multifunctional B/C Fiber Composites for Radiation Shielding

Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama A versatile, novel, multifunctional hybrid structural composite of a high-hydrogen epoxy matrix (UN-10) coupled with boron and carbon fibers (IM-7) has been developed. Prototype laminates of 18×18 in. (≈46×46 cm), with the nominal areal density of 0.35 g/cm2, were fabricated in this effort. The hydrogen atoms in the epoxy will provide shielding strength against high-energy protons, electrons, and heavy ionic species, while the boron fibers that have a high neutron cross-section will help shield against neutrons and reduce the buildup of high-energy photons from secondary reactions. The carbon fibers will provide improved mechanical strength.

Posted in: Briefs

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