Special Coverage

Supercomputer Cooling System Uses Refrigerant to Replace Water
Computer Chips Calculate and Store in an Integrated Unit
Electron-to-Photon Communication for Quantum Computing
Mechanoresponsive Healing Polymers
Variable Permeability Magnetometer Systems and Methods for Aerospace Applications
Evaluation Standard for Robotic Research
Small Robot Has Outstanding Vertical Agility
Smart Optical Material Characterization System and Method
Lightweight, Flexible Thermal Protection System for Fire Protection
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The Ultimate Tool for Characterizing Materials during Mechanical Tests and Validating FEA during Component Tests

The Digital Image Correlation Technology (DIC) is a non-contact 3D measurement tool that measures deformation and strain during material testing. DIC is a single system that replaces strain gages, accelerometers, LVDT’s, string potentiometers, extensometers, laser trackers, and surface scanners. The results are full field, and presented as an experimental representation of a finite model.

Posted in: On-Demand Webinars, Materials

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Temperature-Regulating Fabrics Keep Babies Comfortable

Materials designed for spacesuits now regulate heat in baby clothes and blankets.Spinoff is NASA's annual publication featuring successfully commercialized NASA technology. This commercialization has contributed to the development of products and services in the fields of health and medicine, consumer goods, transportation, public safety, computer technology, and environmental resources.

Posted in: Articles, Materials, Human factors, Infants, Thermal management, Fabrics

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The Heavy Impact of Advanced Lightweight Materials

Historically, high-strength materials have been heavy and dense. The need for high-strength but lightweight materials has become more widespread when designing everything from vehicles and aircraft, to buildings and wind turbines. These advanced materials are enabling engines to operate efficiently at higher temperatures, use less fuel, and emit fewer pollutants, as well as finding uses in many other applications.

Posted in: Articles, Materials, Technical review, Lightweight materials, Durability

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'Tougher-than-Metal' Hydrogels Support New Biomaterials

Scientists from Japan's Hokkaido University have created tough hydrogels combined with woven fiber fabric. The "fiber-reinforced soft composite" fabrics are highly flexible, stronger than metals, and can support a number of potential applications, including artificial ligaments and tendons subjected to load-bearing tension.

Posted in: News, Materials

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Mechanical Metamaterials Can Block Symmetry of Motion

An artist’s rendering of mechanical metamaterials. (Credit: Cockrell School of Engineering) Engineers and scientists at the University of Texas at Austin and the AMOLF institute in the Netherlands have invented mechanical metamaterials that transfer motion in one direction while blocking it in the other. The material can be thought of as a mechanical one-way shield that blocks energy from coming in but easily transmits it going out the other side. The researchers developed the mechanical materials using metamaterials, which are synthetic materials with properties that cannot be found in nature.

Posted in: News, Materials, Motion Control

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Benefits of Silicone Elastomers for Healthcare Applications

When the human body requires support or artificial replacements in order to function properly or to boost the healing process, it is essential that the materials employed meet the highest quality requirements. Pure silicones support meeting these demands, and their extraordinary properties make them ideal for highly sensitive healthcare applications.

Posted in: Webinars, On-Demand Webinars, Materials, Medical

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Light-Absorbent Material Keeps Buildings Cool

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have created a thin, flexible, light-absorbing material that absorbs more than 87 percent of near-infrared light. The technology could someday support the development of solar cells; transparent window coatings to keep cars and buildings cool; and lightweight shields that block thermal detection.

Posted in: News, Materials

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