Special Coverage

Lightweight, Flexible Thermal Protection System for Fire Protection
High-Precision Electric Gate for Time-of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers
Polyimide Wire Insulation Repair System
Distributed Propulsion Concepts and Superparamagnetic Energy Harvesting Hummingbird Engine
Aerofoam
Wet Active Chevron Nozzle for Controllable Jet Noise Reduction
Magnetic Relief Valve
Active Aircraft Pylon Noise Control System
Unmanned Aerial Systems Traffic Management
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Multi-Phase Ceramic System

Bearing surfaces are typically either metal-on-metal (MOM), ceramic-on-ceramic (COC), or metal-on-polyethylene (MOP). MOM and MOP couplings have the drawback that metallic or polyethylene particles can sometimes separate from the couplings, which can cause significant problems, particularly in a hip or joint replacement. COC couplings are less likely to lose particles due to wear, which makes them more biocompatible, but they are more susceptible to fracture. COC couplings also have a tendency to squeak as they move. Innovators at NASA’s Glenn Research Center have developed a technique using rare earth elements to fabricate a dual-phase ceramic composite that combines a wear-resistant phase and a solid-state lubricant phase. The result is a coupling material that, compared to currently used materials, exhibits a tenfold reduction in the friction coefficient, a sixfold reduction in wear, and a significant reduction in debris caused by wear. Glenn’s groundbreaking rare-earth aluminate composite has considerable potential, not only in biomedical applications, but also in commercial and industrial sectors.

Posted in: Briefs, Ceramics, Materials

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Minimally Machined HoneySiC Panels and T300 HoneySiC

The materials are intended for low areal density and near-zero CTE optomechanical structures.The primary purpose of this work is to develop and demonstrate technologies to manufacture ultra-low-cost precision optical systems for very large x-ray, UV/optical, or infrared telescopes.

Posted in: Briefs, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials

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Flexible Volumetric Structure

These composite elastic skins can be tailored for specific applications.NASA’s Langley Research Center has developed composite elastic skins for covering shape-changing (morphable) structures. These skins are intended especially for use on advanced aircraft that change shapes in order to assume different aerodynamic properties. Examples of aircraft shape changes include growth or shrinkage of bumps, conformal changes in wing planforms, cambers, twists, and bending of integrated leading and trailing-edge flaps. Prior to this invention, there was no way of providing smooth aerodynamic surfaces capable of large deflections while maintaining smoothness and sufficient rigidity.

Posted in: Briefs, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials

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Aeroplastic Composites

Aeroplastic refers to a family of polymeric composites with properties that provide a significant reduction in heat transfer. These composites reduce the thermal conductivity of the base polymer resin between 20%-50% without changing its mechanical properties or modifying the original techniques for processing those polymers. The composites can be made into fibers, molded, or otherwise processed into usable articles. Aeroplastic composites are superior alternatives to prior composite materials with respect to both their thermal conductivity and physical properties.

Posted in: Briefs, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials

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Simulating Composite Structures

Layered composites are often the materials of choice when a manufacturer must reduce the weight (lightweight) of a component or system to increase fuel efficiency while maintaining strength. Composites are often used in automobiles, aircraft, ships and wind turbines for this purpose. But because their strength and performance depend upon the thickness, layer structure, orientation and other factors, determining how composite structures will perform in real-world conditions is not as easy as it is for metallic components of the same shape. Read this white paper to learn how you can use ANSYS Composite PrepPost to perform layup simulations to optimize composites for strength, durability and light weight.

Posted in: White Papers, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Composites, Materials

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Reticulated Foams Expand The Boundaries Of Cellular Solids

Ideally suited for high-tech applications, reticulated foams of ceramic or metal provide industry as well as the research community with an extraordinarily versatile material form that can be engineered for particular properties and tailored for specific applications. The interconnected lattice of continuous ligaments within the cellular structure provides greater strength than shorter fibers and also ensures uniform material characteristics throughout the structure.

Posted in: White Papers, Defense, Manufacturing & Prototyping, Coatings & Adhesives, Materials

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Thermomechanical Methodology for Stabilizing Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) Response

SMA training can be completed in a matter of minutes, rather than days or even weeks. Shape memory alloys (SMAs), sometimes known as “smart metals,” provide a lightweight, solid-state alternative to conventional actuators and switches, such as hydraulic, pneumatic, or motor-based systems. To function properly, SMAs must be “trained” to return to a previous form when heated, and innovators at NASA’s Glenn Research Center have developed a remarkable new method of completing this training at a fraction of the time and cost of conventional training techniques. Glenn’s technique uses mechanical cycling, rather than more complicated and time-consuming thermal cycling, to train SMAs before implementation. In addition, this new approach to training allows SMAs to be applied to complex geometric components, so that they may be used in a broader number of applications.

Posted in: Briefs, Materials, Sensors and actuators, Switches, Metals, Smart materials

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