Ganaio High-Output Regenerative Damper

John Gewarges
Ganaio
El Cajon, CA

Simply put, electric vehicles do not drive as far on a single charge as their ICE counterparts do on a single tank of gas. This forces EV makers to spend more on charging infrastructure and battery capacity causing EVs to become too expensive for most. Vehicle subsystems like the suspension damper are inherently inefficient, wasting potential energy in the form of heat dissipation. Ganaio restores that energy by converting it to electric and charging an EV’s battery pack allowing for longer driving range at a lower cost than the equivalent battery energy cost.

“The genesis of our product, the Ganaio High-Output Regenerative Damper, lies in our team’s deep commitment to sustainable technology,” said Co-Founder and CEO John Gewarges. “During collaborative brainstorming sessions, a shared passion for enhancing energy efficiency sparked the vision to revolutionize damper systems. Motivated by a desire to contribute to a greener future, we conceptualized a regenerative damper that not only addresses energy dissipation challenges but also efficiently transfers energy for reuse. This innovative approach stems from our collective dedication to creating impactful solutions that transcend traditional engineering boundaries.”

Producing an average 2,000 Watts of constant power, a Ganaio damper set generates up to an additional 12 percent driving range on an EV. Using Faraday’s Law of Induction, the fully patented Ganaio damper is engineered to the highest magnetic field density attainable within the space of any given suspension architecture, while maintaining a simple design for manufacturing and assembly. A direct replacement of the existing damper, a Ganaio damper is integrated into any vehicle, unaffecting the suspension architecture and general assembly at the factory.

According to Gewarges, the team encountered nuanced challenges in the design and development of their high-output regenerative damper. “Optimizing the regenerative system for maximum efficiency demanded a delicate balance between energy capture and efficient transfer during damping. Addressing these technical intricacies required innovative engineering solutions, involving extensive simulations and prototyping. Material selection posed a challenge, necessitating a balance between weight, durability, and performance,” he said.

“Ensuring optimal energy capture efficiency through rigorous lab testing and iterative refinement was paramount to guarantee the damper’s reliability,” he added. “Navigating these challenges showcased our team’s resilience and commitment to pushing the boundaries of traditional damper design for a sustainable and high-performance solution.”

Ganaio allows vehicle manufacturers to reduce the cost of energy while also creating a higher demand for electric vehicles based on longer driving range. The current market price for a Lithium-ion battery pack is at least $200/kWh. A Ganaio damper set only costs $26/kWh for the equivalent battery energy density.

The company is actively advancing toward commercialization, with the primary focus on launching its product within the next 12-18 months for EVs. “Engaging with industry partners and potential investors, we aim to bring this innovative damper to market efficiently,” said Gewarges.

According to him, “Its applications extend across diverse sectors, including water dams, lake reserves, cliff-side ocean generators, exercise machines, and electric hybrid vehicles. Ganaio promises enhanced energy recovery and improved performance, making it a versatile solution for industries seeking sustainable and high-efficiency damping technology. Our commitment to broad industry adoption aligns with the damper’s potential to significantly impact energy management across various applications, contributing to a more sustainable future.”

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This article first appeared in the November, 2023 issue of Tech Briefs Magazine.

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