The Langley Research Center has developed an innovative method for acquiring fluid-level measurements. This method eliminates the need for the fluid-level sensor to have a physical connection to a power source or data acquisition equipment. The complete system consists of a lightweight, thin-film magnetic-field-response fluid-level sensor and a magnetic field response recorder.

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Efforts are underway at the Ames Research Center to develop inexpensive, low-power electronic sensors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) - for measuring parts-per-million and parts-per-billion of selected gases at room temperature. The electrical resistances of SWCNTs can be made to vary with concentrations of gases of interest by coating or doping the SWCNTs with suitable materials.

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NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has made further improvements in the ongoing development of ion-channel biosensors. These sensors offer advantages of greater stability, greater lifetime, and individual electrical addressability, relative to prior ion-channel biosensors. Improvements in design and fabrication have been made.

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