Ircon® (Santa Cruz, CA) has introduced the ScanIR® 3 infrared linescanners and thermal imaging system. The ScanIR3 Series includes a choice of eight models. Robust housing incorporates standard watercooling and air purge, and also features built-in laser sighting. A rugged processor box also provides universal input and output (I/O) capabilities in the field, without the need for an external computer.

Unlike point sensors, the linescanner measures multiple temperature points across a scan line. Its motorized mirror scans at rates up to 150 lines per second, allowing rapid detection of temperature non-uniformities and hot spots. Rotating optics collect infrared radiation at 1024 points within a 90-degree field of view. An optical resolution of up to 200:1 enables detection of smaller temperature anomalies. A two-dimensional image is formed as the material moves across the linescanner’s field-of-view. The unit’s processor box supports various industry interfaces, including Ethernet, fiber optics (optional), and analog/digital I/O.

In addition, the multifunctional ScanView Pro software allows custom configuration of ScanIR3 operating parameters, and display of thermal images and temperature profiles on a standard personal computer (PC). The software includes features to subdivide thermal images from the ScanIR3 linescanner into portions of specific interest. Temperatures in each portion can be processed for a certain math function, such as average, maximum, or minimum temperature. In case of a thermal defect, a fail-safe alarm is triggered and logged. The software also includes a movie playback function for stored thermal images.

The ScanIR3 linescanner is offered with an optional, modular, high-temperature enclosure system specifically designed to protect the scanner from exposure to ambient temperatures up to 1994 °F (1090 °C).

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Imaging Technology Magazine

This article first appeared in the December, 2013 issue of Imaging Technology Magazine.

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