When first introduced, brushless DC motors, despite their many advantages, were cast as a costly alternative to brush-commutated motors, and were typically only specified for low-power applications where long life was the primary desired requirement. Without the mechanical brush-commutator mechanism that would wear and eventually result in motor failure, brushless motors could be relied upon to deliver performance over time. As for other advantages, conventional wisdom held that brushless motors provide high speed and fast acceleration, generate less audible noise and electromagnetic interference, and require low maintenance. Brush-commutated motors, on the other hand, would afford smooth operation and greater economy.

Figure 1. The slotless motor assembly.
In the past decade, brushless motors have gained broader appeal and greater acceptance in industry for a wider range of applications previously dominated by brush-commutated products, due in part to dramatic reductions in the cost and size of electronic components, and advances in motor design and manufacturing.

At the same time, manufacturers have further sought to challenge conventional wisdom by improving brushless motor design in an effort to combine the traditional advantages of brush-commutated and brushless types. A noteworthy example of how far these innovations have progressed involves the slotless (instead of slotted) construction of the brushless motor’s stationary member, or stator (Figure 1).

The slotless stator design originated with the goal to deliver smooth-running performance and eliminate cogging, which is an unwanted characteristic especially in slower-running applications (less than 500 rpm). The absence of cogging is, in fact, the most-often cited reason for selecting a slotless brushless motor.

Slotted Motor Construction

Figure 2. Comparison of slotted and slotless motors.
Most brushless motors (slotted or slotless) use electronic commutation — usually Hall-effect sensors and magnets — in place of brushes (Figure 2). The motor’s rotor consists of a steel shaft with permanent magnets or a magnetic ring fixed around the circumference of the shaft. The magnets are responsible for producing torque. As the flux density of the magnet material increases, the amount of torque available from the rotor assembly increases.

In traditional slotted brushless motors, the stator features a group of slotted steel laminations (0.004" to 0.025" thick) that are fused to form a solid, uniform stack and create a series of teeth. Wound copper coils, which produce electromagnetic fields, are then inserted into each of the slots. Together, the laminated stack and wound copper coil form the stator assembly. The return path completing the magnetic circuit consists of the laminated material outboard of the copper windings in the stator, and the motor housing.

These brushless slotted motors are especially powerful because the teeth around which the copper wire is wound place the iron closer to the magnets, so the magnetic circuit is completed more efficiently. As the air gap between iron and magnets is reduced, the torque available for the motor is increased.

Figure 3. Slotted motor cogging effects.
However, slotted stators are known to cause cogging, which is attributed to the teeth in their construction. Cogging occurs when the permanent magnets on the rotor seek a preferred alignment with the slots of the stator. Winding copper wires through the slots tends to increase this effect. As magnets pass by the teeth, they have a greater attraction to the iron at the ends of the teeth than to the air gaps between them. This uneven magnetic pull causes the cogging, which ultimately contributes to torque ripple, efficiency loss, motor vibration, and noise, as well as preventing smooth motor operation at slow speeds (Figure 3). A slotless stator offers a solution to the problems experienced with cogging in slotted brushless DC motors.

Slotless Motor Construction

Instead of winding copper wires through slots in a laminated steel stack as in conventional slotted brushless motors, slotless motor wires are wound into a cylindrical shape and are encapsulated in a high-temperature epoxy resin to maintain their orientation with respect to the stator laminations and housing assembly. This configuration, which replaces the stator teeth, eliminates cogging altogether and results in desired quiet operation and smooth performance. The slotless design also reduces damping losses related to eddy currents. These currents are weaker in a slotless motor because the distance between the laminated iron and magnets is greater than in a slotted motor.