A new learning system improves a robot’s ability to mold materials into target shapes and make predictions about interacting with solid objects and liquids. The system, known as a learning-based particle simulator, could give industrial robots a more refined touch and may have applications in personal robotics.

A new “particle simulator” improves robots’ abilities to mold materials into simulated target shapes and interact with solid objects and liquids. (MIT)

In robotic planning, physical simulators are models that capture how different materials respond to force. Robots are “trained” using the models to predict the outcomes of their interactions with objects such as pushing a solid box or poking deformable clay. But traditional learning-based simulators mainly focus on rigid objects and are unable to handle fluids or softer objects. Some more accurate physics-based simulators can handle diverse materials but rely heavily on approximation techniques that introduce errors when robots interact with objects in the real world.

The new model learns to capture how small portions of different materials — “particles” — interact when they’re poked and prodded. The model directly learns from data in cases where the underlying physics of the movements are uncertain or unknown. Robots can then use the model as a guide to predict how liquids, as well as rigid and deformable materials, will react to the force of its touch. As the robot handles the objects, the model also helps to further refine the robot’s control.

In experiments, a robotic hand with two fingers (called “RiceGrip”) accurately shaped a deformable foam to a desired configuration — such as a T shape — that serves as a proxy for sushi rice. In short, the researchers’ model serves as a type of “intuitive physics” brain that robots can leverage to reconstruct three-dimensional objects somewhat similarly to how humans do.

A key innovation behind the model, called the particle interaction network (DPI-Nets), was creating dynamic interaction graphs that consist of thousands of nodes and edges that can capture complex behaviors of so-called particles. In the graphs, each node represents a particle. Neighboring nodes are connected with each other using directed edges that represent the interaction passing from one particle to the other. In the simulator, particles are hundreds of small spheres combined to make up some liquid or a deformable object.

The graphs are constructed as the basis for a machine-learning system called a graph neural network. In training, the model over time learns how particles in different materials react and reshape. It does so by implicitly calculating various properties for each particle, such as its mass and elasticity, to predict if and where the particle will move in the graph when perturbed. The model then leverages a “propagation” technique that instantaneously spreads a signal throughout the graph. The researchers customized the technique for each type of material — rigid, deformable, and liquid — to shoot a signal that predicts particle positions at certain incremental time steps. At each step, it moves and reconnects particles, if needed.

The model was demonstrated by tasking the two-fingered RiceGrip robot with clamping target shapes out of deformable foam. The robot first uses a depth-sensing camera and object-recognition techniques to identify the foam. The researchers randomly select particles inside the perceived shape to initialize the position of the particles. Then, the model adds edges between particles and reconstructs the foam into a dynamic graph customized for deformable materials.

Because of the learned simulations, the robot already has a good idea of how each touch, given a certain amount of force, will affect each of the particles in the graph. As the robot starts indenting the foam, it iteratively matches the real-world position of the particles to the targeted position of the particles. Whenever the particles don’t align, it sends an error signal to the model. That signal tweaks the model to better match the real-world physics of the material.

The researchers are looking to improve the model to help robots better predict interactions with partially observable scenarios, such as knowing how a pile of boxes will move when pushed, even if only the boxes at the surface are visible and most of the other boxes are hidden. They are also exploring ways to combine the model with an end-to-end perception module by operating directly on images.

For more information, contact Abby Abazorius at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; 617-253-2709.

Motion Design Magazine

This article first appeared in the June, 2019 issue of Motion Design Magazine.

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