A system that samples gases at multiple remote locations and delivers the gases to two or possibly more gas-monitoring instruments (e.g., mass spectrometers) has been developed. The system includes a transport (suction) pump that draws the gases from the sampling locations, through transport tubes, into a plenum, which is large enough to act as a buffer against changes in pressure in the transport tubes. Connected to each transport tube at a location near the plenum are two or more sample tubes that are, in turn, connected to manifolds of sample-selector valves through which gases are drawn into the instruments. Each instrument is equipped with a sampling (suction) pump that draws gas from one of the transport tubes that has been selected by opening the corresponding sample-selector valve. Each sampling pump is operated under feedback flow and pressure control to maintain a steady instrument-inlet pressure needed to ensure stable instrument readings. The sample flow thus diverted from the transport tube is kept to one-fifth or less of the transport flow in order to minimize the perturbation of the transport flow and thus, further, minimize any effect of one instrument on the other.

This work was done by Barry Davis, Carolyn A. Mizell, and Frederick W. Adams of Kennedy Space Center and Timothy Griffin, Curtis M. Lampkin, Guy Naylor, and Richard J. Hritz of Dynacs Engineering Co., Inc. For further information, access the Technical Support Package (TSP) free on-line at www.nasatech.com/tsp under the Physical Sciences category. KSC-12123