Mechanical Engineering Associate Professor Carmel Majidi of Carnegie Mellon University describes his lab's creation of a stretchable, electrically conductive material that can repair itself when damaged - ideal for applications in soft robotics and electronics. The lab's work was published in Nature. The new composite material is composed of liquid metal droplets suspended in a soft elastomer. When damaged, the droplets rupture to form new connections, and self-healing occurs spontaneously. " /> Soft, Electrically Conductive Material Can Autonomously Self-Heal - Tech Briefs

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Soft, Electrically Conductive Material Can Autonomously Self-Heal

Mechanical Engineering Associate Professor Carmel Majidi of Carnegie Mellon University describes his lab's creation of a stretchable, electrically conductive material that can repair itself when damaged - ideal for applications in soft robotics and electronics. The lab's work was published in Nature. The new composite material is composed of liquid metal droplets suspended in a soft elastomer. When damaged, the droplets rupture to form new connections, and self-healing occurs spontaneously.