Sensors Detect Disease Markers in Breath

A small, thin square of organic plastic can detect disease markers in breath or toxins. The sensor chip can be used by patients and discarded.

Posted in: INSIDER, News, Detectors, Sensors
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Sound-Off: How Can Organizations Ensure Security in the Cloud?

A reader asks: "How can organizations that use cloud services maintain security of customer data?" See our expert's response — and write one of your own.

Posted in: News, Data Acquisition
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‘Creating the Future’: Water Purifier Requires Only Sunlight

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 780 million people do not have access to clean water sources. The inventor of a water-purification technology hopes to change that statistic and offer an affordable and sustainable way of addressing the global water crisis.

Posted in: News, News, Energy Harvesting, Renewable Energy, Solar Power
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Wearable System Guides Visually Impaired Users

A new wearable system from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology will help blind users navigate through indoor environments.

Posted in: MDB, News, News, Imaging, Sensors
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Assessing brain bleeding in head injuries with new device

In a clinical trial conducted among adults in 11 hospitals, researchers have shown that a hand-held EEG device approved in 2016 by the U.S. FDA that is commercially available can quickly and with 97 percent accuracy rule out if a person with a head injury is likely to have brain bleeding and needs further evaluation and treatment.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
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Giant shipworm could reveal clues about human medicine, bacterial infections

Northeastern professor Daniel Distel and his colleagues have discovered a dark, slithering 4-foot-long creature that dwells in the foul mud of a remote lagoon in the Philippines. They say studying the animal, a giant shipworm with pinkish siphons at one end and an eyeless head at the other, could add to our understanding of how bacteria cause infections and, in turn, how we might adapt to tolerate or even benefit from them.

Posted in: MDB, News, Medical
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New handheld fiber-optic probe brings endoscopic diagnosis of cancer closer to clinic

In an important step toward endoscopic diagnosis of cancer, researchers have developed a handheld fiber-optic probe that can be used to perform multiple nonlinear imaging techniques without the need for tissue staining. The new multimodal imaging probe uses an ultrafast laser to create nonlinear optical effects in tissue that can reveal cancer and other diseases.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
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Cells grow more naturally in 'spaghetti'

The usual way of cultivating cells is to use a flat laboratory dish of glass. However, inside a human body, the cells do not grow on a flat surface but rather in three dimensions. This has lead researchers at Lund University in Sweden to develop a porous "spaghetti" of tissue-friendly polymers with cavities in which the cells can develop in a more natural way.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
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Sound-Off: Will Vehicles Go from Metal to Plastic?

A reader asks: "In the next 5 years, which areas of the vehicle will see a conversion from metal to plastic?" Tech Briefs invites you to share your thoughts and “Sound Off!”

Posted in: News, Automotive
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Next-generation heart valve regenerates into heart-like tissue

The human heart beats approximately 35 million times every year, effectively pumping blood into the circulation via four different heart valves. Unfortunately, in over 4 million people each year, these delicate tissues malfunction due to birth defects, age-related deteriorations, and infections, causing cardiac valve disease.

Posted in: News, News, Medical
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